Jackson and Bud's Bumpy Ride: America's First Cross-Country Automobile Trip
Jackson and Bud's Bumpy Ride: America's First Cross-Country Automobile Trip
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Annotation: Describes the first transcontinental automobile trip across the United States in which a Vermont doctor, his mechanic, and a dog traveled from San Francisco to New York, in a landscape that had few paved roads, no gas stations, and no repair shops.
Genre: Geography
Catalog Number: #4471556
Format: Library Binding
All Formats: Search
Publisher: Millbrook Press
Copyright Date: 2009
Edition Date: 2009
Illustrator: Hargis, Wes,
Pages: 32
Availability: Available
ISBN: 0-8225-7885-9
ISBN 13: 978-0-8225-7885-7
Dewey: 917.3
LCCN: 2008012752
Dimensions: 24 x 28 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
It might be difficult for children to imagine a time when cars didn't rule the road, and roads themselves didn't rule the landscape, but this true account will take them back to an era when that scenario seemed unlikely. In 1903, Horatio Jackson wagered that he could drive a "horseless buggy" across the country, and puttered out from San Francisco to New York with a mechanic buddy. En route, they pick up the quintessential driving partner, a dog named Bud, who becomes a focal point for all the people marveling at the sensational driving machine blowing through town at upward of 30 miles per hour. Setting up the blueprint for countless cross-country road trips to come, they encounter all manner of breakdowns, tough luck, and rousing adventure along the way. Hargis' glib cartoon illustrations of the begoggled trio and their clanging, mud-spattered auto are a terrific match to the lighthearted narrative. An afterword provides a deeper appreciation for just how remarkable and historical their adventure really was. Easily accesible history here.
Horn Book
Through journal entries and conversations, sixteen-year-old Janie, a bulimic, describes her stay in a psychiatric hospital. The story centers on Janie's therapy sessions and the conflicts between patient groups (e.g., the Barfers and the Starvers). While Janie's recovery is a bit too quick, Littman's portrayal of the issues surrounding eating disorders is honest and effective. Reading list, websites.
Kirkus Reviews
Two men and a dog set off on the first transcontinental car trip in this fetching re-creation of a true story. <p>Two men and a dog set off on the first transcontinental car trip in this fetching re-creation of a true story. Responding to a $50 bet, Horatio Jackson hires a mechanic, buys a 20-horsepower Winton (this was 1903) and sets out from San Francisco, acquiring a bulldog along the way. Considering that there were but 150 miles of paved road in the whole country at the time--and neither gas stations nor many road signs--their 5,600-mile journey to New York, accomplished in just 63.5 days, stands as a triumph of sheer perseverance. In his cartoon pictures Hargis depicts all three of his goggle-wearing travelers having the time of their lives, determinedly riding their increasingly mud-spattered horseless carriage through mountains, deserts and storms. The author sticks closely to the historical record in her present-tense narrative and layers in more detail, plus photos, in a closing note. Though she doesn't fill in all the blanks--where, for instance, did they find gas and spare parts?--her invitation to clamber aboard will be hard to resist. <i>(Informational picture book. 7-9) </i></p>
School Library Journal
Gr 25 Short sentences and readable prose capture much of the triumph and challenge of the 63-day trip undertaken in 1903 by Horatio Jackson, who was motivated by a $50 bet, and Sewall J. Crocker, his mechanic. Along the way, they picked up Bud, a goggles-wearing white bull dog. There were virtually no paved roads and no roadside amenities, and the Winton auto broke down frequently. Grasshoppers, mosquitoes, deserts, and mud added to the adventure. An entry for June 20, "Lost Near Green River, Wyoming," describes a miserable encounter with rain that sank the vehicle deep into the mud. The animated, cartoon illustrations are lighthearted and detailed, and add much to the narrative. Readers will be amused to find that the grueling journey cost Jackson $8000, all for a $50 bet that he never collected. Although the author includes fictionalized dialogue and is not clear about the authenticity of the dated entries, the afterword provides additional historical information and archival photographs. Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
ALA Booklist (4/1/09)
Horn Book (8/1/09)
Kirkus Reviews
School Library Journal (4/1/09)
Wilson's Children's Catalog
Bibliography Index/Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Word Count: 1,733
Reading Level: 3.9
Interest Level: 1-4
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 3.9 / points: 0.5 / quiz: 127878 / grade: Lower Grades
Reading Counts!: reading level:4.3 / points:3.0 / quiz:Q46295
Lexile: AD810L
Guided Reading Level: N
Fountas & Pinnell: N

Dr. Horatio Jackson wasn't necessarily a betting man. But in 1903, he overheard a stranger saying that it was just not possible to drive across the United States in one of those unreliable, newfangled automobiles. Jackson disagreed - he believed in the future of the automobile. So he made a $50 bet with the man that he could drive a car from San Francisco to New York. Jackson bought a used Winton automobile, hired a mechanic named Crocker, packed some supplies, and adopted Bud, a bulldog who became their mascot. The trio's only goal was to make it from San Francisco all the way to New York City in one piece. Yet 5,600 miles and 63 1/2 days later, what they actually did was make history. This true story is based on Jackson's own account of the first automobile trip across the United States. Find out more about this fascinating story by watching the book trailer: Jackson and Bud's Bumpy Ride Book Trailer: Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff


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