Your Place in the Universe
Your Place in the Universe

List Price:

$31.50
School Discount
Price:

$22.05
Qty(25-99)
Discount Price:

$21.61
Qty(100-249)
Discount Price:

$21.39
Qty(250-499)
Discount Price:

$21.17
Qty(>500)
Discount Price:

$20.73
To purchase this item, you must first login or register for a new account.

Annotation: With crisp illustration and intriguing science, this title introduces readers to the mind-boggling scale of the known universe.
Genre: Physics
Catalog Number: #254006
Format: Perma-Bound Edition from Publisher's Hardcover
All Formats: Search
Publisher: Holiday House
Copyright Date: 2020
Edition Date: 2020
Pages: 40
Availability: Available
ISBN: Publisher: 0-8234-4623-9 Perma-Bound: 0-7804-8805-9
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-0-8234-4623-0 Perma-Bound: 978-0-7804-8805-2
Dewey: 530.8
LCCN: 2019038030
Dimensions: 27 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
The illustrator of Nine Months: Before a Baby Is Born (2019) here introduces the concepts of size, scale, and distance to a young audience. Beginning with the book the reader is holding (approximately 10 inches high), Chin moves incrementally up in scale to a child, an ostrich, and a giraffe, eventually quantifying distances from the Earth to the Milky Way, the cosmic web, and the observable universe. Each full-bleed spread contains brief text, digitally enhanced watercolor-and-gouache illustrations, and a variety of captions and sidebars that further elucidate these big ideas. Many spreads also depict items from previous examples, offering reference to the sizes and scales portrayed. Blue hues predominate (particularly for the cosmic spreads), with green, purple, and orange used as accents. As always, Chin is a stickler for details (the book was vetted by two Harvard astrophysicists); all illustrations are shown to scale with the exception of one or two final entities that would otherwise spread beyond the page. A worthy addition to STEM literature; concluded with generous back matter.
Horn Book
The relative sizes of objects can be endlessly fascinating to curious young minds. How many books tall is an eight-year-old? How many eight-year-olds standing on shoulders reach the height of an ostrich? What makes Chin's (Grand Canyon, rev. 1/17; and others) new science picture book exceptional is how far he takes the concept. Beginning with a group of children and a telescope, the story proceeds through imagined scenarios (see: ostrich example above) to compare trees (from oaks to redwoods); buildings (the Eiffel Tower to the Burj Khalifa to the planned kilometer-high Jeddah Tower); objects in space. As we progress through the pages, the units of measurement grow from inches to feet and then miles, until we are measuring in millions of miles and finally light years, as readers discover our place in the Milky Way and beyond. Complex concepts (such as local galaxy groups and super clusters) are clearly defined throughout in simple captions elucidating Chin's watercolor and gouache art. Maintaining accurate scale in the comparisons of earthbound objects throughout the first half of the book introduces the concept of relative size in an easy-to-understand way. When Chin moves out beyond Earth's atmosphere, he takes greater and greater artistic license in his depictions of the inconceivable vastness of our galaxy and everything beyond. Extensive back matter delves deep into current understandings of the size, age, and complexity of the universe. Sources are listed along with child-friendly websites for further exploration of the big and small ideas presented in this out-of-this-world science picture book. Eric Carpenter
Kirkus Reviews
From a Caldecott and Sibert honoree, an invitation to take a mind-expanding journey from the surface of our planet to the furthest reaches of the observable cosmos.Though Chin’s assumption that we are even capable of understanding the scope of the universe is quixotic at best, he does effectively lead viewers on a journey that captures a sense of its scale. Following the model of Kees Boeke’s classic Cosmic View: The Universe in Forty Jumps (1957), he starts with four 8-year-old sky watchers of average height (and different racial presentations). They peer into a telescope and then are comically startled by the sudden arrival of an ostrich that is twice as tall…and then a giraffe that is over twice as tall as that…and going onward and upward, with ellipses at each page turn connecting the stages, past our atmosphere and solar system to the cosmic web of galactic superclusters. As he goes, precisely drawn earthly figures and features in the expansive illustrations give way to ever smaller celestial bodies and finally to glimmering swirls of distant lights against gulfs of deep black before ultimately returning to his starting place. A closing recap adds smaller images and additional details. Accompanying the spare narrative, valuable side notes supply specific lengths or distances and define their units of measure, accurately explain astronomical phenomena, and close with the provocative observation that “the observable universe is centered on us, but we are not in the center of the entire universe.”A stimulating outing to the furthest reaches of our knowledge, certain to inspire deep thoughts. (afterword, websites, further reading) (Informational picture book. 8-10)
Publishers Weekly
This dizzyingly powerful exploration of comparative scale starts with an inclusive group of eight-year-old children who are -about five times as tall as this book, but only half as tall as... this ostrich,- which is itself -taller than two eight-year-olds standing on each other-s shoulders.- Page-turn cliffhangers build a pleasing buzz of suspense as Caldecott Honoree Chin (Grand Canyon) adroitly guides readers from ostriches to redwood trees, past skyscrapers and Mount Everest, through Earth-s layered atmosphere to the moon, and beyond the solar system to the edges of the observable universe. Brief asides offer crystalline explanations of supplemental information, including units of measurement from inches to light-years (-One foot is equal to 12 inches. Feet are useful for measuring things that are taller than humans, such as ostriches and giraffes-) and concepts such as orbits, the speed of light, and the limitations of human perception from one-s place in an enormous universe. Chin-s realistic watercolor and gouache illustrations render awestruck children and cosmic shimmer with inimitable skill, and a magnificent spread comparing Mount Everest-s mass to that of human-built structures is likely to draw gasps. Extensive back matter centers scale and astronomical concepts. Ages 4-8. (Sept.)
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
From a Caldecott and Sibert honoree, an invitation to take a mind-expanding journey from the surface of our planet to the furthest reaches of the observable cosmos.Though Chin’s assumption that we are even capable of understanding the scope of the universe is quixotic at best, he does effectively lead viewers on a journey that captures a sense of its scale. Following the model of Kees Boeke’s classic Cosmic View: The Universe in Forty Jumps (1957), he starts with four 8-year-old sky watchers of average height (and different racial presentations). They peer into a telescope and then are comically startled by the sudden arrival of an ostrich that is twice as tall…and then a giraffe that is over twice as tall as that…and going onward and upward, with ellipses at each page turn connecting the stages, past our atmosphere and solar system to the cosmic web of galactic superclusters. As he goes, precisely drawn earthly figures and features in the expansive illustrations give way to ever smaller celestial bodies and finally to glimmering swirls of distant lights against gulfs of deep black before ultimately returning to his starting place. A closing recap adds smaller images and additional details. Accompanying the spare narrative, valuable side notes supply specific lengths or distances and define their units of measure, accurately explain astronomical phenomena, and close with the provocative observation that “the observable universe is centered on us, but we are not in the center of the entire universe.”A stimulating outing to the furthest reaches of our knowledge, certain to inspire deep thoughts. (afterword, websites, further reading) (Informational picture book. 8-10)
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
Starred Review for Horn Book (7/1/20)
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews (7/1/20)
Starred Review for Publishers Weekly (7/1/20)
ALA Booklist (7/1/20)
Bibliography Index/Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Word Count: 1,942
Reading Level: 5.7
Interest Level: K-3
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 5.7 / points: 0.5 / quiz: 510402 / grade: Lower Grades
Guided Reading Level: S

Explore the known Universe and consider its mind-boggling scale in this crisply illustrated, well-researched picture book from Caldecott honoree Jason Chin.
 
Winner of the Cook Prize!


Most eight-year-olds are about five times as tall as this book . . . but only half as tall as an ostrich, which is half as tall as a giraffe . . . twenty times smaller than a California Redwood! How do they compare to the tallest buildings? To Mt. Everest? To stars, galaxy clusters, and . . . the universe?

Jason Chin, the award-winning author and illustrator of Grand Canyon has once again found a way to make a complex subject--size, scale and almost unimaginable distance--accessible and understandable to readers of all ages. Meticulously researched and featuring the highly detailed artwork for which he is renowned, this is How Much is a Million for the new millenium, sure to be an immediate hit with kids looking for an engaging way to delve into perspective, astronomy, and astrophysics. Curious readers will love the extensive supplementary material included in the back of the back of the book


An American Library Association Notable Children’s Book

A New England Book Award Finalist
A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year
A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
A Junior Library Guild Gold Standard Selection
A Horn Book Fanfare Best Book of the Year
A Bank Street Best Children's Book of the Year!


*Prices subject to change without notice and listed in US dollars.
Perma-Bound bindings are unconditionally guaranteed (excludes textbook rebinding).
Paperbacks are not guaranteed.
Please Note: All Digital Material Sales Final.