Jumbo: The Making of the Boeing 747
Jumbo: The Making of the Boeing 747

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Annotation: For the 50th anniversary of the Boeing 747's first commercial flight, a picture book about the development of the iconic passenger plane and how it changed the history of air travel.
Catalog Number: #212260
Format: Perma-Bound Edition from Publisher's Hardcover
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Special Formats: Hot Title Hot Title
Common Core/STEAM: STEAM STEAM
Copyright Date: 2020
Edition Date: 2020
Pages: 48
Availability: Available
ISBN: Publisher: 1-250-15580-0 Perma-Bound: 0-605-02664-5
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-1-250-15580-1 Perma-Bound: 978-0-605-02664-3
Dewey: 629
Language: English
Reviews:
Kirkus Reviews
In a properly lap- and eye-filling format (it has a 2-foot wingspan), a soaring tribute to the “Queen of the Skies.”Following Go for the Moon (2019), Gall pays homage to another outsize triumph of engineering wizardry and industrial might. A mammoth machine two and a half times larger than any other jet liner of its time, Boeing’s 747 is so big, he claims, that the Wright brothers could have made their entire first flight in its fuselage without leaving the coach section. It debuted in 1968 and, though now retired from domestic use, is still the fastest commercial passenger plane in the world. Drawn with Gall’s customary clean precision, a mix of dramatically angled full-body portraits, glimpses of workers in a gigantic assembly plant, cutaway views of cockpit and spacious seating areas, detailed sectional diagrams of wings and engines, and flocks of smaller aircraft from a paper plane to a suddenly dinky-seeming 737 combine to underscore the scope of the technological achievement as well as both the sheer scale of the jet and of the effort that went into building it. There is also a dream-come-true element, as a red-haired, pale-skinned child frequenting the pictures through each stage of the leviathan’s design and assembly makes a final appearance in the pilot’s seat and turns out to be Lynn Rippelmeyer, the first woman to captain a 747. Clad in late-20th-century attire, the small human figures clustering throughout add a sense of period but are nearly all white.A blast from the past, sure to transport fans of all things big and loud. (glossary, source list, “fun facts,” afterword) (Informational picture book. 7-9)
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
In a properly lap- and eye-filling format (it has a 2-foot wingspan), a soaring tribute to the “Queen of the Skies.”Following Go for the Moon (2019), Gall pays homage to another outsize triumph of engineering wizardry and industrial might. A mammoth machine two and a half times larger than any other jet liner of its time, Boeing’s 747 is so big, he claims, that the Wright brothers could have made their entire first flight in its fuselage without leaving the coach section. It debuted in 1968 and, though now retired from domestic use, is still the fastest commercial passenger plane in the world. Drawn with Gall’s customary clean precision, a mix of dramatically angled full-body portraits, glimpses of workers in a gigantic assembly plant, cutaway views of cockpit and spacious seating areas, detailed sectional diagrams of wings and engines, and flocks of smaller aircraft from a paper plane to a suddenly dinky-seeming 737 combine to underscore the scope of the technological achievement as well as both the sheer scale of the jet and of the effort that went into building it. There is also a dream-come-true element, as a red-haired, pale-skinned child frequenting the pictures through each stage of the leviathan’s design and assembly makes a final appearance in the pilot’s seat and turns out to be Lynn Rippelmeyer, the first woman to captain a 747. Clad in late-20th-century attire, the small human figures clustering throughout add a sense of period but are nearly all white.A blast from the past, sure to transport fans of all things big and loud. (glossary, source list, “fun facts,” afterword) (Informational picture book. 7-9)
Starred Review ALA Booklist
*Starred Review* From the striking jacket art to the appended fast facts, this handsome volume delivers a good deal of information about the world's first jumbo jet, the Boeing 747. When it debuted in 1970, the 747 was significantly larger than existing airplanes. Its design entailed innovation and its assembly required a gigantic facility. Boeing constructed a building so tall that clouds formed above its rafters. Even today, it's the biggest building (by volume) on Earth. While Gall's text explains aspects of how the plane was built, his nicely composed, sometimes riveting digital pictures help readers understand the technical aspects of flight, such as gravity, lift, drag, thrust, and how pilots control an airplane's motion. Within the pictures, a girl becomes a visual stand-in for young readers as she makes a model airplane at home, demonstrates hydraulic brakes using her bicycle, and becomes a passenger on the jumbo jet's first commercial flight. One illustration hints that when she grows up, she will pilot a 747. In the appended author's note, Gall describes building, testing, and flying his own small plane, and his hands-on knowledge lends authority to the main text. An intriguing book for any kid who is passionate (or even a little curious) about planes.
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
Starred Review ALA Booklist
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
Reading Level: 3.0
Interest Level: K-3

For the 50th anniversary of the Boeing 747's first commercial flight, a picture book about the development of the iconic passenger plane and how it changed the history of air travel. In 1968, the biggest passenger jet the world had ever seen premiered in Everett, Washington. The giant plane was called the Boeing 747, but reporters named it "the Jumbo jet." There was only one problem. It couldn't fly. Yet. Jumbo details the story of the world's first wide body passenger jet, which could hold more people than any other plane at the time and played a pivotal role in allowing middle class families to afford overseas travel. Author and illustrator Chris Gall, himself a licensed pilot, shows how an innovative design, hard work by countless people, and ground-breaking engineering put the Jumbo jet in the air. On January 22, 1970, the Boeing 747 made it's first transatlantic flight, taking passengers from New York to Paris in seven hours.


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