Reawakening Our Ancestors' Lines: Revitalizing Inuit Traditional Tattooing
Reawakening Our Ancestors' Lines: Revitalizing Inuit Traditional Tattooing
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Annotation: For thousands of years, Inuit women practised the traditional art of tattooing. Created with bone needles and caribou sinew soaked in seal oil or soot, these tattoos were an important tradition for many women, symbols stitched in their skin that connected them to their families and communities.
Catalog Number: #209856
Format: Publisher's Hardcover
No other formats available
Publisher: Lemniscaat USA
Copyright Date: 2017
Edition Date: 2017
Pages: 70 pages
Availability: Available
New Title: Yes
ISBN: 1-7722-7169-1
ISBN 13: 978-1-7722-7169-0
Dewey: 391.65089971
Dimensions: 29 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up Johnston chronicles her mission of learning about and preserving Inuit traditional tattoos and methods of tattooing while also profiling the women, young and old, living in Kugluktuk, Nunavut, who embarked on this journey with her. The volume opens with a moving introduction from Johnston, who details the many motivations behind the Inuit Tattoo Revitalization project, including her desire to have tattoos like those of her ancestors and to continue a tradition that colonizers, missionaries, and residential schools tried to erase. She also discusses the inking methods she adapted based on research and the stories of elders before segueing into the individual profiles of those who participated. In photo journal style, the book contains personal narratives from each woman about her life, her connection to Inuit culture, and the inspiration behind her chosen tattoos, with high-quality images documenting the process and the final results. The large format of the book also makes it perfect for browsing. There are few resources on this subject for this audience, and the prioritizing of Inuit women's voices further cements this as a necessary read. VERDICT A deeply personal and empowering work that readers will return to again and again. For most YA nonfiction collections. Meaghan Nichols, ASI Heritage, Ont.
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School Library Journal (5/1/18)
Reading Level: 6.0
Interest Level: 9-12

For thousands of years, Inuit women practised the traditional art of tattooing. Created with bone needles and caribou sinew soaked in seal oil or soot, these tattoos were an important tradition for many women, symbols stitched in their skin that connected them to their families and communities. But with the rise of missionaries and residential schools in the North, the tradition of tattooing was almost lost. In 2005, when Angela Hovak Johnston heard that the last Inuk woman tattooed in the traditional way had died, she set out to tattoo herself and learn how to tattoo others. What was at first a personal quest became a project to bring the art of traditional tattooing back to Inuit women across Nunavut, starting in the community of Kugluktuk. Collected in this beautiful book are moving photos and stories from more than two dozen women who participated in Johnston's project. Together, these women are reawakening their ancestors' lines and sharing this knowledge with future generations.


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