One Earth: People of Color Protecting Our Planet
One Earth: People of Color Protecting Our Planet

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Annotation: This nonfiction book for teens profiles twenty environmental defenders of color from around the world. Their individual stories show that the intersection of environment and ethnicity is an asset to protecting our planet. Illustrated with photos of each of the people profiled.
Genre: Biographies
Catalog Number: #206043
Format: Perma-Bound Edition
All Formats: Search
Common Core/STEAM: STEAM STEAM
Publisher: Orca Books
Copyright Date: 2020
Edition Date: 2020
Pages: 207 pages
Availability: Available
ISBN: Publisher: 1-459-81886-5 Perma-Bound: 0-7804-7259-4
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-1-459-81886-6 Perma-Bound: 978-0-7804-7259-4
Dewey: 920
LCCN: 2019947360
Dimensions: 22 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
Rao interviews 20 people of color or Indigenous heritage who are working to protect our little, blue planet. The content is neatly sorted into six sections like community involvement, the defense of ancestral lands, and wildlife conservation. One section even goes, without preaching, into sustainable meat-eating practices. There's something for everyone, whether you want to be an activist at home or an organizer in the community. Even better, Rao exposes the reader to a variety of cultures and bodies of knowledge, such as New Zealand's M?ori, Iran's nomadic peoples, and the Arctic Indigenous. It's an eye-opener and, with each chapter divided into a few spotlights, digestible in small bits. Handy for references, chock-full of full-color photos, with a helpful glossary in the back, it's an excellent resource that, placed in the hands of a budding environmentalist, will inspire action, whether large or small. An important representation of the contributions made by people of color and Indigenous people d a beautiful celebration of diversity.
Horn Book
Rao interviews twenty BIPOC environmental "defenders" from ten countries and one unceded First Nations territory. Each profile follows an individual's path to activism, emphasizing racial and cultural identities and tracing a through-line from childhood interests and experiences to current initiatives. The activists' work includes advocating for sustainable agriculture and building practices, protecting old growth forests, fighting for clean water, and promoting veganism. Color photographs, "Did You Know?" and "What Can You Do?" features, and boxed quotations enhance the inspiring accounts. A glossary, index, and list of related organizations and websites are appended.
Kirkus Reviews
Conservation biologist Rao introduces 20 "environmental defenders" who are black, Indigenous, and people of color, inspiring young readers and environmentalists.When Rao entered the environmental field decades ago, she didn't encounter many people who looked like her. But, she writes, "my culture and my passion for the earth are linked," and she shows how that is the case for the defenders she interviewed for this book. Indonesian Muslim urban designer Nana Firman had limited results talking about "sustainability" and "conservation" with communities; when she identified Islamic foundations for stewardship, she found language that connected people to the cause. Oakland native Rue Mapp founded Outdoor Afro to connect African Americans to nature by holding space for the histories of injustice and exclusion black Americans have experienced in outdoor spaces and using a social justice lens to create safe and welcoming outdoor experiences. These environmental defenders hail from all over the world and vary greatly in ethnicity, culture, age, and religious background. The ways in which they protect the Earth vary too, but their messages echo each other with hope in what can happen when people come together and make small changes that add up. Each short biography, enhanced by attractive color photographs and engaging sidebars, also illustrates how the defenders came to their chosen paths—thought-provoking reading for young people figuring out their own contributions.This valuable compilation shows that Earth's salvation lies in the diversity of its people. (glossary, resources, index) (Nonfiction. 12-18)
Publishers Weekly
In this series of profiles, Rao, a conservation biologist who notes that -at work, I-ve usually been the only one with a brown face,- centers the stories of 20 environmental activists, all people of color. Rao-s prose is plain, but the activists- stories are extraordinary, from Dipani Sutaria-s quest to encourage the study and protection of India-s Irrawaddy
School Library Journal
Gr 58 The author, a Canadian-born conservation biologist of Indian and Indigenous descent, uses her background as a source of knowledge and strength to defend Earth from harmful and destructive practices. Rao highlights 20 other people of color who are actively working to protect or restore various parts of the environmentwildlife, soil, water quality, forests, and other elements. Each person explains how their identity (race, language, culture, etc.) gives them a strong knowledge or background to address their environmental issue. The text mentions several Indigenous people from North and South America working to protect Native land and waters. By profiling 20 people in less than 200 pages, the book is a little choppy. There are few transitions between people and categories. Some biographies abruptly end, leaving the reader to wonder if the person has been successful or not. Nonetheless, it is refreshing to read of these activists' enthusiasm and determination to change our physical world for the better. VERDICT For larger libraries or libraries looking to expand their potential career offerings, this is a good choice to show how anyone can defend our world. Lisa Crandall, formerly at the Capital Area District Library, Holt, MI
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
Conservation biologist Rao introduces 20 "environmental defenders" who are black, Indigenous, and people of color, inspiring young readers and environmentalists.When Rao entered the environmental field decades ago, she didn't encounter many people who looked like her. But, she writes, "my culture and my passion for the earth are linked," and she shows how that is the case for the defenders she interviewed for this book. Indonesian Muslim urban designer Nana Firman had limited results talking about "sustainability" and "conservation" with communities; when she identified Islamic foundations for stewardship, she found language that connected people to the cause. Oakland native Rue Mapp founded Outdoor Afro to connect African Americans to nature by holding space for the histories of injustice and exclusion black Americans have experienced in outdoor spaces and using a social justice lens to create safe and welcoming outdoor experiences. These environmental defenders hail from all over the world and vary greatly in ethnicity, culture, age, and religious background. The ways in which they protect the Earth vary too, but their messages echo each other with hope in what can happen when people come together and make small changes that add up. Each short biography, enhanced by attractive color photographs and engaging sidebars, also illustrates how the defenders came to their chosen paths—thought-provoking reading for young people figuring out their own contributions.This valuable compilation shows that Earth's salvation lies in the diversity of its people. (glossary, resources, index) (Nonfiction. 12-18)
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
Starred Review for Publishers Weekly
ALA Booklist (3/1/20)
Horn Book (8/1/20)
School Library Journal (4/1/20)
Bibliography Index/Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 199-202) and index.
Reading Level: 5.0
Interest Level: 7-12
Lexile: 1050L

 The activists stories are extraordinary...Its a powerful answer to Raos framing questions: Who is an environmental defender? What does she or he look like? Maybe like you. Maybe like me.Publishers Weekly, starred review

 Thought-provoking reading for young people figuring out their own contributions. This valuable compilation shows that Earths salvation lies in the diversity of its people.Kirkus Reviews, starred review

One Earth profiles Black, Indigenous and People of Color who live and work as environmental defenders. Through their individual stories, the book shows that the intersection of environment and ethnicity is an asset to achieving environmental goals. The twenty short biographies introduce readers to diverse activists from all around the world, who are of many ages and ethnicities. From saving ancient trees on the West Coast of Canada, to protecting the Irrawaddy dolphins of India, to uncovering racial inequalities in the food system in the United States, these environmental heroes are celebrated by author and biologist Anuradha Rao, who outlines how they went from being kids who cared about the environment to community leaders in their field. One Earth is full of environmental role models waiting to be found.


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