Good Rosie!
Good Rosie!
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Annotation: Beloved storyteller Kate DiCamillo and cartoonist Harry Bliss introduce some delightfully doggy dogs in a warm, funny tale of a timid pup who finds friends at the local dog park.
Catalog Number: #169493
Format: Perma-Bound from Publisher's Hardcover
Special Formats: Graphic Novel Graphic Novel
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Copyright Date: 2018
Edition Date: 2018
Illustrator: Bliss, Harry,
Pages: 32
Availability: Available
ISBN: Publisher: 0-7636-8979-3 Perma-Bound: 0-7804-2786-6
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-0-7636-8979-7 Perma-Bound: 978-0-7804-2786-0
Dewey: E
LCCN: 2018956915
Dimensions: 25 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
Short, episodic chapters and a gentle plotline make this winsome graphic novel particularly well suited to early readers. George and Rosie, a brown-and-white terrier, have a pretty solid routine of breakfast, a walk, and looking at clouds, but Rosie is lonely. George, a balding, bespectacled gentleman with a cane and a long coat, eventually catches on and takes Rosie to the dog park. But new dogs are scary to shy Rosie, and it takes some time before she finally warms up to the other pups at the park. Bliss' naturalistic, amiable cartoons appear on wide, open panels, and close-ups of George's and the dogs' faces make characters' feelings unmistakable, which will be particularly helpful for newly independent readers. Despite the story's low page count, DiCamillo infuses a surprising amount of character development: George recognizes his pal's loneliness; Rosie gets over her shyness; and three very different dogs figure out how to be friends. With humor and heart, this easy, inviting volume offers an empowering message to little ones nervous about making new friends.
Horn Book
Timid terrier Rosie and middle-aged man George lead a humdrum life until she meets Saint Bernard Maurice and vivacious little Fifi at the dog park. Comic-book panels, with easy narrative text and balloon dialogue, make this a good choice for new readers; Blisss crisp line-and-watercolor illustrations are lovingly attentive to real dog poses. DiCamillo expertly drops musings about the quirks of friendship into the deceptively straightforward story.
Kirkus Reviews
A lonely, brown-and-white terrier named Rosie learns how to stand up to a bully and how to make new friends in this understated, gently humorous story.Rosie lives with her owner, George, a middle-aged, balding man with glasses and suspenders and a rather staid lifestyle. Though Rosie loves George, she would really like to meet another dog, so on their daily walks they begin visiting a dog park. At first Rosie doesn't know how to make friends, but a tiny, bouncy dog named Fifi teaches Rosie and a blustery Saint Bernard named Maurice how it's done. Rosie's journey takes her from loneliness through fear and bravery and then on to joyous companionship with her new pals. By the conclusion, the three dogs are running and playing together, and George is chatting with two women on a park bench, making friends of his own. George is white, and two of the other dog owners are people of color. Each of the three dogs has a distinct personality, conveyed both in the succinct text and in engaging watercolor illustrations laid out in panels of different configurations as well as some full-page illustrations. Cartoonist Bliss' humor shines as it works with DiCamillo's understated text.Subtle lessons about entering a new and unfamiliar territory, finding companions, and the value of a friendly, approachable attitude are all conveyed with a delicate touch. Good Rosie—good story. (Picture book. 4-8)
Publishers Weekly
Rosie the terrier and her middle-aged owner, George, are loving companions and creatures of habit. But when Rosie sees her reflection in her empty food bowl (-The other dog never answers-), she yearns for companions of her own species. One day, George decides to visit the local dog park, and Rosie is more than a little hesitant (-Rosie does not like the dog park. There are too many dogs.-). Then she meets Fifi the Chihuahua and Maurice the Saint Bernard. Though their friendship is not without initial missteps (Rosie must overcome her innate reticence, Maurice must promise that he will not try to eat Fifi-again), it changes Rosie-s world. DiCamillo-s deep empathy for her shy, lonely protagonist will come as no surprise, but her portrayal of Rosie as genuinely puzzled by the mechanics of friendship is particularly astute. Bliss (Diary of a Worm) works in a paneled comics format, and it proves felicitous for his formal drawing style and deadpan humor. This is no shaggy dog story-it-s thoughtful and funny, and a real gift for emerging readers. Ages 5-8. Author-s and illustrator-s agent: Holly McGhee, Pippin Properties. (Sept.)
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
A lonely, brown-and-white terrier named Rosie learns how to stand up to a bully and how to make new friends in this understated, gently humorous story.Rosie lives with her owner, George, a middle-aged, balding man with glasses and suspenders and a rather staid lifestyle. Though Rosie loves George, she would really like to meet another dog, so on their daily walks they begin visiting a dog park. At first Rosie doesn't know how to make friends, but a tiny, bouncy dog named Fifi teaches Rosie and a blustery Saint Bernard named Maurice how it's done. Rosie's journey takes her from loneliness through fear and bravery and then on to joyous companionship with her new pals. By the conclusion, the three dogs are running and playing together, and George is chatting with two women on a park bench, making friends of his own. George is white, and two of the other dog owners are people of color. Each of the three dogs has a distinct personality, conveyed both in the succinct text and in engaging watercolor illustrations laid out in panels of different configurations as well as some full-page illustrations. Cartoonist Bliss' humor shines as it works with DiCamillo's understated text.Subtle lessons about entering a new and unfamiliar territory, finding companions, and the value of a friendly, approachable attitude are all conveyed with a delicate touch. Good Rosie—good story. (Picture book. 4-8)
Word Count: 890
Reading Level: 1.9
Interest Level: K-3
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 1.9 / points: 0.5 / quiz: 197968 / grade: Lower Grades
Reading Counts!: reading level:2.6 / points:1.0 / quiz:Q75414
Lexile: 490L
Guided Reading Level: M
Fountas & Pinnell: M

Beloved storyteller Kate DiCamillo and cartoonist Harry Bliss introduce some delightfully doggy dogs in a warm, funny tale of a timid pup who needs a friend.

Rosie is a good dog and a faithful companion to her owner, George. She likes taking walks with George and looking at the clouds together, but the closest she comes to another dog is when she encounters her reflection in her empty dog bowl, and sometimes that makes Rosie feel lonely. One day George takes Rosie to the dog park, but the park is full of dogs that Rosie doesn’t know, which makes her feel lonelier than ever. When big, loud Maurice and small, yippy Fifi bound over and want to play, Rosie’s not sure how to respond. Is there a trick to making friends? And if so, can they all figure it out together?


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