We Rise, We Resist We Raise Our Voices: Words and Images of Hope
We Rise, We Resist We Raise Our Voices: Words and Images of Hope
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Annotation: What do we tell our children when the world seems bleak, and prejudice and racism run rampant? With 96 lavishly designed pages of original art, poetry, and prose, fifty diverse creators lend voice and comfort to young activists.
Catalog Number: #167637
Format: Publisher's Hardcover
All Formats: Search
Copyright Date: 2018
Edition Date: 2018
Pages: 87 pages
Availability: Available
ISBN: 0-525-58042-5
ISBN 13: 978-0-525-58042-3
Dewey: 303.3
Dimensions: 25 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
When it seems like all around us there is bad news, tension, injustice, and racism, children now have an additional source of inspiration in their search for peace, strength, equality, and hope in this vibrant and heartfelt anthology. More than 50 authors and illustrators, including such acclaimed luminaries as Jacqueline Woodson, Margarita Engle, Jason Reynolds, Ekua Holmes, and Javaka Steptoe, share their experiences of injustice and their words of advice and encouragement in the forms of poetry, songs, and stories. Some are written in the form of letters to their own children and loved ones; others as heartbreaking stories of their own personal experiences; still others are reminders and advice that should not be forgotten, or powerful poetic words. What they all have in common is a stirring message to readers that they are not alone. The beautiful, poetic text of each story is paired perfectly with the unique, beautifully varied illustrations accompanying them, and together they serve to remind children to never give up, hold their heads up high, and always hold onto hope.
Horn Book
In young ninja Yukio's second holiday-themed adventure (Samurai Santa), doting little sis Kashi annoyingly emulates all of his Halloween trick-or-treating preparations; her copycat costume is the final straw. But then Kashi cleverly invokes Yukio's spooky urban legend about Samurai Scarecrow to get some well-deserved respect. Thoughtful text design enhances the spare, funny narrative. Digital illustrations in a limited orange-and-purple palette capture the siblings' relatable range of emotions.
Kirkus Reviews
An anthology of poetry, essays, short stories and art designed to lift children up, especially children from traditionally marginalized communities, during difficult times.This collection encourages America's children to remember their history, learn from it, and choose to be kind in the face of hatred, racism, and oppression. "Throughout history, kids like you / were right there. / With picket signs and petitions….They changed this world for the better. / And you will too," Kelly Starling Lyons tells readers in her poem "Drumbeat for Change." Featuring contributions from such writers as Jacqueline Woodson, Ellen Oh, and Hena Khan, and an equally august lineup of illustrators, including Rafael López, Vanessa Brantley-Newton, and Javaka Steptoe, every work packs an emotional punch. In his poem "A Thousand Winters," Kwame Alexander wonders "if words, sentences, and books aren't enough, anymore" as he reflects on the state of the world and hard conversations with his daughter. A stunning collage by Ekua Holmes accompanies Alexander's poem; in it, a vivid, violet sky surrounds a sleepy black girl sitting atop her father's shoulders. Every work in this beautiful collection feels personal and is meant to inspire and comfort.A love song from children's literature's brightest stars to America's Indigenous children and children of color, encouraging them to be brave and kind. (contributor biographies, index) (Anthology. 8-18)
Publishers Weekly
Wade and Cheryl Willis Hudson, founders of Just Us Books, offer this empowering anthology to counter today-s often-unsettling political climate for children of varying ethnicities, faiths, identities, and abilities. The husband-and-wife team present 30 illustrated essays, poems, stories, and letters from more than 50 diverse children-s book creators. Contributions aim to calm, sustain, and inspire children. In -A Talkin--To,- Jason Reynolds reassures readers that -everything bad and frightening and loud/ will always hide when you hold your head up,/ will always hide when you hold your heart out.- Hena Khan-s essay urges Muslim children
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
An anthology of poetry, essays, short stories and art designed to lift children up, especially children from traditionally marginalized communities, during difficult times.This collection encourages America's children to remember their history, learn from it, and choose to be kind in the face of hatred, racism, and oppression. "Throughout history, kids like you / were right there. / With picket signs and petitions….They changed this world for the better. / And you will too," Kelly Starling Lyons tells readers in her poem "Drumbeat for Change." Featuring contributions from such writers as Jacqueline Woodson, Ellen Oh, and Hena Khan, and an equally august lineup of illustrators, including Rafael López, Vanessa Brantley-Newton, and Javaka Steptoe, every work packs an emotional punch. In his poem "A Thousand Winters," Kwame Alexander wonders "if words, sentences, and books aren't enough, anymore" as he reflects on the state of the world and hard conversations with his daughter. A stunning collage by Ekua Holmes accompanies Alexander's poem; in it, a vivid, violet sky surrounds a sleepy black girl sitting atop her father's shoulders. Every work in this beautiful collection feels personal and is meant to inspire and comfort.A love song from children's literature's brightest stars to America's Indigenous children and children of color, encouraging them to be brave and kind. (contributor biographies, index) (Anthology. 8-18)
Reading Level: 3.0
Interest Level: 3-6
Lexile: 850L
This book was inspired by our great-niece Jordyn. After the 2016 presidential election, she was distraught upon hearing who had won. She had heard the cruel and hateful words that had been spewed at women, those with disabilities, people of different faiths, and people of color. She had heard the talk aimed at "taking our country back." Though she was only seven, some of that language of hate stayed with her. When she found out who the new president would be, she was frightened and confused, worried that the world as she knew it was in imminent danger.
We were so troubled. We knew there were thousands--no, millions--of young people like Jordyn, and perhaps, like you, too, who were fearful about the future. What could we tell you? we wondered. What words of comfort could we offer? How could we reach out to you the way others had reached out to us when we were your age and faced difficult challenges that seemed too big for us to handle?
So the idea for this treasury was born. Yes, we are living in challenging times, but we created this book so you will know that you are part of a community that loves you and can give you tools to help navigate the present and the future.
We grew up in the segregated South, when life for us was much different than it is today. Racial discrimination, prejudice, and hatred against African Americans were pervasive. We were prohibited from attending school with White children, so we went to all-Black schools. We couldn't go to the public library that Whites used. We were forced to sit in a "special section" in movie theaters. We couldn't even try on clothes or shoes from the stores downtown. Our parents had to purchase them, bring them home, and then see if they were a good fit. If they weren't, the items couldn't be returned. If there was no fountain designated "Colored" or "Negro" in the store, we had to wait until we got home to get a drink of water, or find another establishment that had a fountain for "us." Our parents were not allowed to vote.
This segregated but unequal system we were forced to endure was extremely trying and often frightening. Yet, in our all-Black communities, we were embraced by accepting arms, motivated by encouraging words, and sheltered by watchful eyes that probed for signs of lurking dangers seeking to engulf us. We were loved! We knew it! We could feel it!
Today's challenges are different from those of the 1950s and 1960s. But we have valuable advice to share with you, nuggets of sustenance for you just as there were for us when we were your age. We invited children's book creators with diverse voices to share their perspectives, words and images of encouragement, and hope and love for you. These talented and thoughtful authors and illustrators have already been creating wonderful books with you in mind.
Within this collection, there's a letter from a parent to her children on kindness; there's advice on how to become confident and mindful; there are words of wisdom about finding and keeping friends; there are reminders of how to use the Golden Rule, how to cope with bullying, and how to face internal uncertainty; and there's an essay on how young people can change the world.
Challenges, some seemingly daunting, will come and go. There will be dark days, and days with bright, warm sunshine. There will be periods of hope, and periods of despair. But when the dark days come, you must remember how the sun shone brightly on your face. When despair looms, you must grasp on to hope and lift it high for all to see. That way, you can face the challenges, no matter what they are, with the determination and confidence necessary not only to endure, but to grow in spite of them.
This book is for you! To inspire you, motivate you, offer you love and hope, and encourage you to help make a difference.

Excerpted from We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Fifty of the foremost diverse children's authors and illustrators--including Jason Reynolds, Jacqueline Woodson, and Kwame Alexander--share answers to the question, "In this divisive world, what shall we tell our children?" in this beautiful, full-color keepsake collection, published in partnership with Just Us Books.

What do we tell our children when the world seems bleak, and prejudice and racism run rampant? With 96 lavishly designed pages of original art and prose, fifty diverse creators lend voice to young activists.

Featuring poems, letters, personal essays, art, and other works from such industry leaders as Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming), Jason Reynolds (All American Boys), Kwame Alexander (The Crossover), Andrea Pippins (I Love My Hair), Sharon Draper (Out of My Mind), Rita Williams-Garcia (One Crazy Summer), Ellen Oh (cofounder of We Need Diverse Books), and artists Ekua Holmes, Rafael Lopez, James Ransome, Javaka Steptoe, and more, this anthology empowers the nation's youth to listen, learn, and build a better tomorrow.
 
A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2018!
A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2018!


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