Rodent Rascals
Rodent Rascals
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Annotation: Life-size illustrations of rodent species from around the world accompany simple, thorough text describing their life cycles, sizes, habitats, and ranges.
Genre: Biology
Catalog Number: #159543
Format: Publisher's Hardcover
All Formats: Search
Publisher: Holiday House
Copyright Date: 2018
Edition Date: 2018
Pages: 29 pages
Availability: Available
ISBN: 0-8234-3860-0
ISBN 13: 978-0-8234-3860-0
Dewey: 599.35
LCCN: 2017019227
Dimensions: 27 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
Horn Book
Twenty-one rodents are briefly introduced and appreciated in actual-size ink illustrations for comparison with one another; for larger rodents such as the capybara, only the head appears. Munro's message is that rodents are a diverse group of clever and useful creatures. Keyed to the understanding and interest of primary grades, with added information on each rodent at the end. Websites. Bib., glos., ind.
Kirkus Reviews
Twenty-one representatives of the largest mammalian order pose in this fetching portrait gallery.Each one depicted, all or in part, at actual size, the rodentine array begins with a pocket-watch-size African pygmy jerboa and concludes with the largest member of the clan, the "sweet-looking capybara." In between, specimens climb the scale past chipmunks and northern flying squirrels to a Norway rat, porcupine, and groundhog. Despite a few outliers such as the naked mole rat and a rather aggressive-looking beaver, Munro's animals—particularly her impossibly cute guinea pig—strongly exude shaggy, button-eyed appeal. Her subjects may come across as eye candy, but they are drawn with naturalistic exactitude, and in her accompanying descriptive comments, she often relates certain visible features to distinctive habitats and behaviors. She also has a terrific feel for the memorable fact: naked mole rats run as quickly backward in their tunnels as forward; African giant pouched rats have been trained to sniff out mines; the house mouse "is a romantic. A male mouse will sing squeaky love songs to his girlfriend" (that are, fortunately or otherwise, too high for humans to hear). Closing summaries will serve budding naturalists in need of further specifics about sizes, diets, geographical ranges, and the like."Humans are lucky to have rodents," Munro argues…and makes her case with equal warmth to hearts and minds. (websites, index) (Informational picture book. 7-9)
Publishers Weekly
Writing with warmth and enthusiasm, Munro celebrates the biodiversity of rodents. She introduces 21 rodents in all, ranging from the house mouse to the naked mole rat, and describes each creature with casual wonder: -Bushy-tailed wood rats or pack rats love to collect bright shiny things, such as keys, bottle caps, and jewelry,- and the African giant pouched rat can be trained to sniff out land mines and detect tuberculosis in labs. Because the animals are drawn to scale, readers get a clear sense of their relative sizes. The world-s largest rodent, a capybara, fills a page with its head and nose alone; the smallest, the pygmy jerboa, occupies just a page corner. Munro blends naturalism with a hint of personality for each rodent, accentuating the positive attributes of an underappreciated group of animals. Ages 6-10. (Feb.)

School Library Journal
Gr 35 Munro's joyful ode to rodents is a refreshing take on these often maligned creatures. The book starts small with the pygmy jerboa and ends big with the capybara. Readers will gain a host of knowledge from the text; the entries on the naked mole rat, prairie dog, and African giant pouched rat contain fascinating information on how these animals survive in their environments or assist humans in complex tasks. The value and cleverness of rodents, particularly as they relate to daily life, are running threads throughout the work. The author also tackles a number of related myths; for example, lemmings "don't really commit suicide by jumping off cliffs into the sea as some say" but rather migrate when forced to by overpopulation. The artwork, created with India ink and colored acrylic inks on paper, is a pleasure to pore over. Illustrations are drawn to scale and skillfully communicate the rodents' physical appearance and hint at their temperament, resulting in an inviting and accurate work. The back matter goes into greater depth for each subject, providing scientific names, average sizes, and more. VERDICT Even the most resistant of readers will fall in love with these rascally rodents. A fine selection for animal collections. Della Farrell, School Library Journal
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
Twenty-one representatives of the largest mammalian order pose in this fetching portrait gallery.Each one depicted, all or in part, at actual size, the rodentine array begins with a pocket-watch-size African pygmy jerboa and concludes with the largest member of the clan, the "sweet-looking capybara." In between, specimens climb the scale past chipmunks and northern flying squirrels to a Norway rat, porcupine, and groundhog. Despite a few outliers such as the naked mole rat and a rather aggressive-looking beaver, Munro's animals—particularly her impossibly cute guinea pig—strongly exude shaggy, button-eyed appeal. Her subjects may come across as eye candy, but they are drawn with naturalistic exactitude, and in her accompanying descriptive comments, she often relates certain visible features to distinctive habitats and behaviors. She also has a terrific feel for the memorable fact: naked mole rats run as quickly backward in their tunnels as forward; African giant pouched rats have been trained to sniff out mines; the house mouse "is a romantic. A male mouse will sing squeaky love songs to his girlfriend" (that are, fortunately or otherwise, too high for humans to hear). Closing summaries will serve budding naturalists in need of further specifics about sizes, diets, geographical ranges, and the like."Humans are lucky to have rodents," Munro argues…and makes her case with equal warmth to hearts and minds. (websites, index) (Informational picture book. 7-9)
Starred Review ALA Booklist
*Starred Review* Did you know there are about 110 species of gerbils? Or that the African giant pouched rat can sniff out dangerous abandoned land mines? Twenty-one amazing rodents with incredible talents and unique features are the focus of this fun and informative title. Each creature is beautifully illustrated in actual size, with soft brushstrokes providing excellent details of the rodent's fur and hair, nails and teeth. Informative paragraphs accompany each rodent and provide interesting details about their size, home, talents, and habits. Readers young and old will be amazed at the many different varieties, sizes, and talents described, and will undoubtedly want to seek out further information about the intelligent creatures included, perhaps even those rodents not included in the book. The crisp, clear font will make it easy for readers to follow along, with the names of each rodent presented in a large, colorful font, and italicized words defined in a glossary. Further detailed, informative paragraphs about each featured rodent follow the main illustrated pages, along with a glossary, resources, a list of related websites for readers to explore, and an index. A fun, unique, and informative addition to all children's nonfiction collections.
Bibliography Index/Note: Includes bibliographical references (page [31]) and index.
Word Count: 3,599
Reading Level: 6.0
Interest Level: K-3
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 6.0 / points: 1.0 / quiz: 501297 / grade: Middle Grades
Lexile: 970L

Meet the rodents of the world in this illustrated guide to 21 species of rascally creatures!

What is the smallest rodent in the world? What is the biggest? How long can rodents live? How do they find mates? Find out all this and more in this wonderfully detailed new book from award-winning author-illustrator Roxie Munro.

With bright, life-sized illustrations and simple text describing the life cycles, habitats, and ranges of these fascinating creatures, Rodent Rascals is packed with fun facts about these often overlooked or maligned creatures. 

From the pygmy jerboa to the capybara, there's a whole world of clever creatures to discover!

Backmatter includes expanded information on all the species featured, a glossary of important vocabulary introduced in the text, a list of further reading, and an index.

 
A Bank Street Best Children's Book of the Year


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