The Odyssey
The Odyssey
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Series: Signet Classics   
Annotation: Chronicles Odysseus's return from the Trojan War and the trials he endures on his journey home.
Catalog Number: #153165
Format: Perma-Bound Edition
Common Core/STEAM: Common Core Common Core
Copyright Date: 2015
Edition Date: 2015
Pages: xxiii, 354 pages
Availability: Available
ISBN: Publisher: 0-451-47433-3 Perma-Bound: 0-7804-0086-0
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-0-451-47433-9 Perma-Bound: 978-0-7804-0086-3
Dewey: 883
Dimensions: 17 cm.
Language: English
Word Count: 120,133
Reading Level: 10.0
Interest Level: 9-12
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 10.0 / points: 24.0 / quiz: 5993 / grade: Upper Grades
Reading Counts!: reading level:9.0 / points:28.0 / quiz:Q08548
Lexile: 830L
Guided Reading Level: U
I

Athene Visits Telemachus

Tell me, Muse, the story of that resourceful man who was driven to wander far and wide after he had sacked the holy citadel of Troy. He saw the cities of many people and he learnt their ways. He suffered great anguish on the high seas in his struggles to preserve his life and bring his comrades home. But he failed to save those comrades, in spite of all his efforts. It was their own transgression that brought them to their doom, for in their folly they devoured the oxen of Hyperion the Sun-god and he saw to it that they would never return. Tell us this story, goddess daughter of Zeus, beginning at whatever point you will.

All the survivors of the war had reached their homes by now and so put the perils of battle and the sea behind them. Odysseus alone was prevented from returning to the home and wife he yearned for by that powerful goddess, the Nymph Calypso, who longed for him to marry her, and kept him in her vaulted cave. Not even when the rolling seasons brought in the year which the gods had chosen for his homecoming to Ithaca was he clear of his troubles and safe among his friends. Yet all the gods pitied him, except Poseidon, who pursued the heroic Odysseus with relentless malice till the day when he reached his own country.

Poseidon, however, was now gone on a visit to the distant Ethiopians, in the most remote part of the world, half of whom live where the Sun goes down, and half where he rises. He had gone to accept a sacrifice of bulls and rams, and there he sat and enjoyed the pleasures of the feast. Meanwhile the rest of the gods had assembled in the palace of Olympian Zeus, and the Father of men and gods opened a discussion among them. He had been thinking of the handsome Aegisthus, whom Agamemnon's far-famed son Orestes killed; and it was with Aegisthus in his mind that Zeus now addressed the immortals:

'What a lamentable thing it is that men should blame the gods and regard us as the source of their troubles, when it is their own transgressions which bring them suffering that was not their destiny. Consider Aegisthus: it was not his destiny to steal Agamemnon's wife and murder her husband when he came home. He knew the result would be utter disaster, since we ourselves had sent Hermes, the keen-eyed Giant-slayer, to warn him neither to kill the man nor to court his wife. For Orestes, as Hermes told him, was bound to avenge Agamemnon as soon as he grew up and thought with longing of his home. Yet with all his friendly counsel Hermes failed to dissuade him. And now Aegisthus has paid the final price for all his sins.'



Excerpted from The Odyssey by Homer
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Teacher's Guide: Odyssey Teacher's Guide

THE GREATEST ADVENTURE OF ALL TIME—NOW WITH A NEW AFTERWORD.
 
Homer’s Odyssey has been called “the first novel,” “the first expression of the mind in literary form,” and “the best story ever written.”  Whether fans of suspense, fantasy or human drama, readers of all ages thrill to Homer’s vibrant picture of Odysseus on his decade-long journey, as he meets the lotus-eaters, cunningly flees Cyclops, angers his gods, resists the sexy Sirens, narrowly escapes Scylla and Charybdis, averts his eyes from Medusa, docks in exotic cities—all the while struggling to make it home to his wife and son.
 
Adventure on the high seas, legendary romance, tests of endurance, betrayal, heroism—the saga has all these and more, imagined by the most famous bard of all time. But, as Aristotle pointed out, “his greatness was that he himself was nowhere to be found in his story. His characters were everywhere.” Blind and possibly illiterate, Homer has still “in loftiness of thought surpass’d”* any storyteller since 900 B.C.E.
 
*John Dryden


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