The House of the Seven Gables: A Romance
The House of the Seven Gables: A Romance

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Series: Signet Classics   

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Annotation: Psychological drama that vividly reflects the social and moral values of New England in the 1840s.
Catalog Number: #141001
Format: Perma-Bound Edition
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Common Core/STEAM: Common Core Common Core
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Copyright Date: 2001
Edition Date: 2001
Pages: 288 pages
Availability: Available
ISBN: Publisher: 0-451-53162-0 Perma-Bound: 0-605-17429-6
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-0-451-53162-9 Perma-Bound: 978-0-605-17429-0
Dewey: Fic
LCCN: 00066196
Dimensions: 18 cm.
Language: English
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
Wilson's Fiction Catalog
Wilson's High School Catalog
Bibliography Index/Note: Includes bibliographcial references (pages 287-288).
Word Count: 102,486
Reading Level: 11.0
Interest Level: 9+
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 11.0 / points: 22.0 / quiz: 12786 / grade: Upper Grades
Reading Counts!: reading level:9.0 / points:30.0 / quiz:Q14052
Lexile: 930L
Half-way down a by-street of one of our New England towns, stands a rusty wooden house, with seven acutely peaked gables facing towards various points of the compass, and a huge, clustered chimney in the midst. The street is Pyncheon-street; the house is the old Pyncheon-house; and an elm-tree, of wide circumference, rooted before the door, is familiar to every town-born child by the title of the Pyncheon-elm. On my occasional visits to the town aforesaid, I seldom failed to turn down Pyncheon-street, for the sake of passing through the shadow of these two antiquities; the great elm-tree and the weather-beaten edifice.

The aspect of the venerable mansion has always affected me like a human countenance, bearing the traces not merely of outward storm and sunshine, but expressive also of the long lapse of mortal life, and accompanying vicissitudes that have passed within. Were these to be worthily recounted, they would form a narrative of no small interest and instruction, and possessing, moreover, a certain remarkable unity, which might almost seem the result of artistic arrangement. But the story would include a chain of events extending over the better part of two centuries, and, written out with reasonable amplitude, would fill a bigger folio volume, or a longer series of duodecimos, than could prudently be appropriated to the annals of all New England during a similar period. It consequently becomes imperative to make short work with most of the traditionary lore of which the old Pyncheon-house, otherwise known as the House of the Seven Gables, has been the theme. With a brief sketch, therefore, of the circumstances amid which the foundation of the house was laid, and a rapid glimpse at its quaint exterior, as it grew black in the prevalent east wind pointing, too, here and there, at some spot of more verdant mossiness on its roof and walls, we shall commence the real action of our tale at an epoch not very remote from the present day. Still, there will be a connection with the long past; a reference to forgotten events and personages, and to manners, feelings, and opinions, almost or wholly obsolete; which, if adequately translated to the reader, would serve to illustrate how much of old material goes to make up the freshest novelty of human life. Hence, too, might be drawn a weighty lesson from the little-regarded truth, that the act of the passing generation is the germ which may and must produce good or evil fruit, in a far-distant time; that, together with the seed of the merely temporary crop, which mortals term expediency, they inevitably sow the acorns of a more enduring growth, which may darkly overshadow their posterity.

The House of the Seven Gables, antique as it now looks, was not the first habitation erected by civilized man on precisely the same spot of ground. Pyncheon-street formerly bore the humbler appellation of Maule's Lane, from the name of the original occupant of the soil, before whose cottage-door it was a cow-path.

Excerpted from The House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthrone
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

This enduring novel of crime and retribution vividly reflects the social and moral values of New England in the 1840s. 

Nathaniel Hawthorne's gripping psychological drama concerns the Pyncheon family, a dynasty founded on pious theft, who live for generations under a dead man's curse until their house is finally exorcised by love. Hawthorne, by birth and education, was instilled with the Puritan belief in America's limitless promise. Yet - in part because of blemishes on his own family history - he also saw the darker side of the young nation. Like his twentieth-century heirs William Faulkner and F. Scott Fitzgerald, Hawthorne peered behind propriety's façade and exposed the true human condition.


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