Each Orange Had 8 Slices: A Counting Book
Each Orange Had 8 Slices: A Counting Book
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Annotation: An illustrated introduction to counting and simple addition.
Genre: Mathematics
Catalog Number: #84303
Format: Perma-Bound Big Book
All Formats: Search
Special Formats: Big Book Big Book
Publisher: Wm. Morrow
Copyright Date: 1992
Edition Date: 1994
Illustrator: Crews, Donald,
Pages: 32
Availability: Available
ISBN: 0-688-13116-6
ISBN 13: 978-0-688-13116-6
Dewey: 513.2
LCCN: 90024167
Dimensions: 37 x 45 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
This bright, well-designed book challenges young children to think analytically about what's on its pages. Each double-page spread includes a large, colorful illustration, three related statements, and three questions that can be answered by counting. For example, On my way to the store I saw 4 trees. Each tree had 3 bird's nests. Each bird's nest had 2 spotted eggs. How many trees were there? How many bird's nests were there? How many spotted eggs were there in all? Since each spread introduces a new venue, there's a great variety of settings (circus, barnyard, backyard) as well as a mix of things to count (trucks, trikes, gumballs). Crews makes the most of the graphic opportunities with art that fills but doesn't overload the pages. Since the objects are organized into sets and subsets, this could be used to introduce the concept of multiplication as well as counting and addition. A welcome choice for math shelves in school and public libraries. (Reviewed Mar. 15, 1992)
Horn Book
For more advanced counters than the audience of their previous collaboration, 'How Many Snails?' (Greenwillow), this book offers plenty of opportunities for counting as high as fifty-four and practicing some basic addition. Crews's bright, graphic pictures are easily read and perfectly suited to this kind of concept book.
Kirkus Reviews
In the style of Giganti and Crews's How Many Snails? (1989), 11 opportunities for children to begin to grasp the concept of multiplication—or simply to count items that may mount into the 50s. The tone is unabashedly didactic: ``Each duck said, `QUACK, QUACK, QUACK.' How many [big] ducks...? How many baby ducks...? How many `QUACKS' were there in all?'' This may sound textbook- like, but plenty of other lessons are introduced in picture book format—so why not basic math? Giganti does leave young readers to make certain discoveries—e.g., the big and little ducks must first be combined if the total number of ``quacks'' are to be derived by multiplying. Crews's crisp, bright double spreads educate the eye to color and design while keeping the numerical component of his illustrations absolutely clear. A humorous final touch: the riddle about the man going to St. Ives—the context increases the difficulty! In the style of Giganti and Crews's How Many Snails? (1989), 11 opportunities for children to begin to grasp the concept of multiplication—or simply to count items that may mount into the 50s. The tone is unabashedly didactic: ``Each duck said, `QUACK, QUACK, QUACK.' How many [big] ducks...? How many baby ducks...? How many `QUACKS' were there in all?'' This may sound textbook- like, but plenty of other lessons are introduced in picture book format—so why not basic math? Giganti does leave young readers to make certain discoveries—e.g., the big and little ducks must first be combined if the total number of ``quacks'' are to be derived by multiplying. Crews's crisp, bright double spreads educate the eye to color and design while keeping the numerical component of his illustrations absolutely clear. A humorous final touch: the riddle about the man going to St. Ives—the context increases the difficulty! Unusually handsome and useful. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Publishers Weekly
Despite its humdrum title, this author-illustrator team's ( How Many Snails? ) latest effort is an unusually stimulating counting book that holds appeal for a wide spectrum of ages. Each spread discloses three facts, followed by three questions, such as: ``On my way to the playground I saw 3 red flowers. Each red flower had 6 pretty petals. Each petal had 2 tiny black bugs.'' Readers are then asked to total how many flowers, how many petals and how many black bugs there are. The very young can count aloud as they point to each object, whereas older children can use multiplication to complete the calculations, which vary in difficulty. Displaying an exceptionally brilliant palette of colors, Crews's typically bold, uncluttered pictures make counting easy for the smallest fingers. Unlike most books of the genre, this will not be quickly outgrown. Ages 3-up. (Mar.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-- The vibrant style of Crews's gouache artwork is well matched to this exceptional introduction to mathematics. A situation is presented in simple sentences. ``On my way to Grandma's I saw 2 fat cows. Each cow had 2 calves. Each calf had 4 skinny legs,'' and the questions follow:``How many fat cows. . . calves . . . legs were there in all?'' The bright, cheerful illustrations boldly amplify the scenes, making interaction easy and fun. Tana Hoban's Count and See (Macmillan, 1972) and 26 Letters and 99 Cents (Greenwillow, 1987), and Mitsumasa Anno's Anno's Counting Book (Crowell, 1977) are other fine counting books. This one, however, takes the concepts a step further to challenge older children's thinking skills without being patronizing or sacrificing integrity for the youngest audiences. Teachers will find it useful for beginning multipliers. The book concludes with the age-old riddle contained in the poem, ``As I was going to St. Ives.'' Its answer is a lighthearted way to finish such an engaging, attractive addition to the concept picture-book genre. --Mary Lou Budd, Milford South Elementary School, OH
Word Count: 528
Reading Level: 2.3
Interest Level: P-2
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 2.3 / points: 0.5 / quiz: 117312 / grade: Lower Grades
Lexile: 400L

Dynamic illustrations and appealing words combine to introduce beginning math concepts and reinforce visual literacy. This oversize edition (14 3/8 by 17 1/2 inches) is perfect for sharing in a library or classroom.

 "An unusually stimulating counting book that holds appeal for a wide spectrum of ages."—Publishers Weekly

If each orange has 8 slices and each slice has 2 seeds, then how many seeds are there in all? You'll have fun multiplying, adding, and counting your way through the math puzzles hiding in the world all around you.

Features clear and colorful illustrations by Donald Crews, the award-winning creator of Freight Train and Truck, among other honored titles. "The vibrant style of Crews's gouache artwork is well matched to this exceptional introduction to mathematics."—School Library Journal


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