Day Light, Night Light: Where Light Comes From
Day Light, Night Light: Where Light Comes From
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Annotation: Discusses the properties of light, particularly its source in heat.
Genre: Physics
Catalog Number: #69393
Format: Perma-Bound Edition
All Formats: Search
Special Formats: Inventory Sale Inventory Sale
Publisher: HarperCollins
Copyright Date: 1998
Edition Date: 1998
Illustrator: Schuett, Stacey,
Pages: 32
Availability: Available (Limited Quantities Available / While Supplies Last)
ISBN: Publisher: 0-06-445171-2 Perma-Bound: 0-605-28652-3
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-0-06-445171-0 Perma-Bound: 978-0-605-28652-8
Dewey: 535
LCCN: 96033316
Dimensions: 20 x 25 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
In this work from the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series, Branley discusses darkness, heat, light sources, reflection, vision, and the speed of light, keeping the examples and vocabulary within a child's experience. A simple activity, observing a white plate in a dark room, gives young children a chance to understand firsthand the idea that some light is always present in our world, despite the appearance of darkness. Handsome acrylic paintings appealingly interpret the text, though the presence of fireflies in some illustrations raises a point not discussed, cold light sources. Overall, the book succeeds admirably in leading readers to look at familiar phenomena from different perspectives. (Reviewed December 1, 1997)
Horn Book
Branley's clear and simple text explains two basic yet important physics concepts: very hot objects produce light, and we see because light from these objects travels to our eyes or reflects off everything else. Multiple examples from children's experiences reinforce these ideas. The illustrations work well with the text, although more emphasis on how light reaches our eyes would help readers' understanding.
Kirkus Reviews
For this Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science entry, originally published in 1975, Schuett brings an artistic spirit to Branley's facts about the origins of light: A child perched in a treehouse discovers light from a luminous jar of fireflies; candles on a birthday cake illustrate the concept of light coming from sources that are hot. Within a text that is somewhat repetitive, Branley offers elementary explanation of properties of light: reflective light, speed of light, and what happens inside an electric light bulb. Sunlight, candlelight, flashlight, campfire, lanterns, and stars are discussed. The mention of simple experiments, e.g., placing a white plate in a dark room, provides hands-on opportunities for very young learners. A snug atmosphere and palette are reminiscent of some scenes in Schuett's own Somewhere in the World Right Now (1996, not reviewed). (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-8)"
Word Count: 999
Reading Level: 3.3
Interest Level: K-3
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 3.3 / points: 0.5 / quiz: 25245 / grade: Lower Grades
Reading Counts!: reading level:2.7 / points:1.0 / quiz:Q02877
Lexile: 630L

Moonlight is really sunlight!

Did you know that the moon doesn't make its own light? Instead, it receives light from the sun and reflects it to us on the Earth. Read and find out about how the sun, the stars and light bulbs make light so we can see.Did you know that moonlight is really sunlight? The moon can't make its own light, so it receives light from the sun and then sends it to us here on the Earth.

Any child who's ever wondered about the fascinating properties of light will want to read this classic science title. Readers will even learn how fast light can travel: from the moon to the Earth in less than three seconds! Veteran science author Franklyn M. Branley's lively text and Stacey Schuett's new illustrations combine fun facts and hands-on activities in this accessible introduction to the science of light.

Did you know that moonlight is really sunlight? The moon can't make its own light, so it receives light from the sun and then sends it to us here on the Earth.

Any child who's ever wondered about the fascinating properties of light will want to read this classic science title. Readers will even learn how fast light can travel: from the moon to the Earth in less than three seconds! Veteran science author Franklyn M. Branley's lively text and Stacey Schuett's new illustrations combine fun facts and hands-on activities in this accessible introduction to the science of light.


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