The War I Finally Won
The War I Finally Won
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Catalog Number: #573179
Format: Paperback (Large Print)
All Formats: Search
Publisher: Thorndike Press
Copyright Date: 2019
Edition Date: 2019
Pages: 457 pages
Availability: Available
ISBN: 1-432-86588-9
ISBN 13: 978-1-432-86588-7
Dewey: Fic
Dimensions: 22 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
In this sequel to Bradley's Newbery Honor Book The War That Saved My Life (2015), Ada finally gets the surgery she needs to repair the clubfoot that limited her mobility and made her believe she was unworthy of love. Now she can walk en run! etter than ever, though she has other wounds to heal; namely, the trauma wrought by her neglectful, abusive mother. Meanwhile, a German Jewish refugee, Ruth, is living with Ada, Susan, and Jamie; Lady Thornton is pricklier than ever; and Ada finds herself struggling to fully comprehend the complex emotions of the adults around her. In an episodic structure, Bradley movingly narrates Ada's gradual emotional growth against the backdrop of WWII, as she comes to trust her friends and family and relinquish some of her need to be in control. Bradley is perhaps at her best when describing Ada's love of horses and the therapeutic effect the animals have on her and Ruth, who's facing prejudice in England and fearing for her family back in Germany. A bittersweet story with a triumphant conclusion.
Horn Book
This sequel to The War That Saved My Life sees Ada's club foot finally corrected and she, younger brother Jamie, and guardian Susan back in their village. Throughout many WWII English homefront events, both mundane and dramatic, runs the thread of Ada's emotional healing as she grows into the young woman she wants to be. Bradley raises hard questions and makes us think--even as she moves us to tears.
Kirkus Reviews
Ada returns in this sequel to Newbery Honor book The War That Saved My Life (2015).Shortly after the events that closed the last book, a successful surgery means overjoyed 11-year-old, white Ada no longer has a clubfoot. She can walk, run, and ride relatively pain-free, but pain returns in a different way: Ada's abusive birth mother has been killed in an air raid. Enough back story is provided that readers new to Ada's story won't be lost. Patient Susan, providing a home to Ada and her little brother, Jamie, during the Blitz, becomes their legal guardian, but Ada, damaged by 10 years of abuse, doesn't ever feel safe. Living in the midst of a world war only adds to Ada's constant worries, and from blackout screens to rations, the stress and strain felt in everyday Kent during World War II is plain. But Ada finds comfort in her horse, Butter, and her family, which grows to include privileged Lady Thorton and Ruth, a teenage, Jewish German refugee. Ada's struggles with her trauma are portrayed with such incredible nuance and heart-wrenching realism that readers are sure to empathize deeply and revel in the joy of watching thoughtful, introspective Ada heal and grow. When tragedy strikes, all suffer, but Ada is able to help another in greater anguish than herself thanks to lessons from her own painful past. Thoughtful, brave, true, and wise beyond her years, Ada is for the ages—as is this book. Wonderful. (Historical fiction. 10-14)
Publishers Weekly
Bradley picks up directly after the events of her Newbery Honor-winning The War That Saved My Life, which introduced tenacious Ada who-after years of mistreatment from her mother because of her club foot-summoned the determination to carve out a better life for herself amid the onset of WWII. The war affects 11-year-old Ada more directly now, as she, her younger brother, and their guardian Susan reunite with the prim Lady Thorton, her daughter Maggie, and their family, and Ada undergoes a surgery that allows her better use of her foot. These familiar characters are joined by Ruth, a 16-year-old Jewish German refugee, who has been separated from her family, including a grandmother detained in a concentration camp. Ada and Ruth-s interactions, which begin warily and flourish into sisterhood and trust, portray a perceptive look into othering; it-s Ada who first sees Ruth is more than her German heritage. Bradley sensitively portrays Ada-s journey to accept selfless kindness and love after years of neglect in a poignant and satisfying story of found family that will stay with readers. Ages 9-12. Agent: Ginger Knowlton, Curtis Brown. (Oct.)
School Library Journal Starred Review
Gr 46Eleven-year-old Ada picks up her story shortly after The War That Saved My Life left off. She's in the hospital, nervously awaiting the surgery that will fix her club foot, when Susan receives a letter from Lady Thornton that obviously upsets her. Turns out, Ada's mother was killed in a bombing. Ada does not know how to feel about that, but, ever practical, she worries about where that leaves her and brother Jamie now that they are war orphans instead of child evacuees. Despite Susan's assurances that the three of them are family now, Ada remains prickly and irritable, particularly when Jamie falls easily into calling Susan "Mum." The three move into a cottage on the Thornton estate and are soon joined by Lady Thornton when the big house is needed for the war effort. Ada is leery of Lady Thornton, but living in close quarters brings out the best and worst in everyone, especially when Lord Thornton arrives with a German Jewish girl named Ruth whom he wishes Susan to tutor. Ada's unique voice helps evoke the novel's vivid setting and numerous complex characters. There is destitution but plenty of humor. There is also plenty of heartbreak and loss, so readers will want to keep a box of tissues handy. VERDICT Fans of the first book will love the sequel even more; truly a first purchase. While it stands alone, encourage readers to read both books to fully appreciate Ada's remarkable and wholly believable triumph.Brenda Kahn, Tenakill Middle School, Closter, NJ
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
Ada returns in this sequel to Newbery Honor book The War That Saved My Life (2015).Shortly after the events that closed the last book, a successful surgery means overjoyed 11-year-old, white Ada no longer has a clubfoot. She can walk, run, and ride relatively pain-free, but pain returns in a different way: Ada's abusive birth mother has been killed in an air raid. Enough back story is provided that readers new to Ada's story won't be lost. Patient Susan, providing a home to Ada and her little brother, Jamie, during the Blitz, becomes their legal guardian, but Ada, damaged by 10 years of abuse, doesn't ever feel safe. Living in the midst of a world war only adds to Ada's constant worries, and from blackout screens to rations, the stress and strain felt in everyday Kent during World War II is plain. But Ada finds comfort in her horse, Butter, and her family, which grows to include privileged Lady Thorton and Ruth, a teenage, Jewish German refugee. Ada's struggles with her trauma are portrayed with such incredible nuance and heart-wrenching realism that readers are sure to empathize deeply and revel in the joy of watching thoughtful, introspective Ada heal and grow. When tragedy strikes, all suffer, but Ada is able to help another in greater anguish than herself thanks to lessons from her own painful past. Thoughtful, brave, true, and wise beyond her years, Ada is for the ages—as is this book. Wonderful. (Historical fiction. 10-14)
Word Count: 67,377
Reading Level: 3.7
Interest Level: 4-7
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 3.7 / points: 9.0 / quiz: 191229 / grade: Middle Grades
Lexile: HL520L

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