The Case of the Vanishing Golden Frogs: A Scientific Mystery
The Case of the Vanishing Golden Frogs: A Scientific Mystery
$22.99
To purchase this item, you must first login or register for a new account.

Annotation: This real-life science mystery follows a team of scientists as they try to save Panamanian golden frogs and find the reasons behind their decline.
Genre: Biology
Catalog Number: #5010098
Format: Library Binding
All Formats: Search
Common Core/STEAM: Common Core Common Core
Publisher: Millbrook Press
Copyright Date: 2012
Edition Date: 2012
Pages: 48 pages
Availability: Available
ISBN: 0-7613-5108-6
ISBN 13: 978-0-7613-5108-5
Dewey: 597.8
LCCN: 2010042642
Dimensions: 26 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
*Starred Review* In 1996, biologist Karen Lips revisited a high mountain forest in Panama, where she had studied Panamanian golden frogs four years earlier. On this trip, though, she found only dead frogs. After a pathologist discovered unusual sacs under their skin, a newspaper article about Lips' research led to communication with other scientists worldwide and the discovery that a fungus was killing off the frogs. Launched in 1999, Project Golden Frog collects healthy animals and keeps them in zoos and conservation centers until the fungus can be controlled and the frogs can be safely returned home. Since 2008, few golden frogs have been found in the wild. Notable for clarity, directness, and simplicity of writing and design alike, this volume, both handsome and fascinating, begins with the hunt for the frogs' killer and ends with the urgent need to create a safe environment for their return to the wild. Excellent photos, microscopic views, and maps illustrate the book. Back matter includes a glossary, recommended reading lists, and an author's note. While few readers will take up Markle's suggestion to "become the science detective who finally stops this killer," many will absorb the notion that scientific research can be intrinsically interesting and vitally important. Pair this book with Turner's The Frog Scientist (2009).
Horn Book
Panamanian golden frogs are dying off, and scientists want to know why. Markle leads readers through a series of questions, carefully examining the evidence collected by researchers to answer each one. Cause of the deaths (a fungus) is eventually uncovered, then steps taken to preserve the remaining population are detailed. Vivid photographs feature scientists and frogs in the field. Reading list, websites. Glos., ind.
Kirkus Reviews
The golden frog, a Panamanian national symbol, began vanishing from its high mountain forests in the late 1990s, prompting a scientific investigation and rescue process that continues today. Veteran science educator Markle (Hip-Pocket Papa, 2010, etc.) describes a mission that has involved scientists from around the world. Organizing her information in short chapters, she opens with a straightforward introduction of both the problem and the two biologists who have been most closely involved. She explains why the increased frog mortality couldn't be blamed on habitat destruction, pollution or global climate change and describes the discovery of the devastating chytrid fungus, explaining how it works to kill frogs and offering some hypotheses that explain how it spread. Finally, she turns to the rescue and search for a cure. Panamanian golden frogs may now be extinct the wild, and no way has yet been found to ensure their survival outside the institutions that keep breeding colonies alive in Panama and in North American zoos. The text is set on golden pages and accompanied by large, clear color photographs and maps. In the backmatter, the author notes that in spite of their common name, these frogs are actually toads and offers suggestions for helping frogs locally and learning about global efforts. A sobering glimpse at science in progress. (glossary, list of books and websites, index) (Nonfiction. 9-13)
School Library Journal
Gr 5&11;7&12; This eye-catching, well-written book provides a window into the efforts of a coalition of scientists, wildlife groups, and zoos to decode the mysterious die-off of the Panamanian golden frog, which began in the mid 1990s. Markle follows the work of biologist Karen Lips as she studied and investigated the deaths of so many of these creatures. Further, it records the work of Project Golden Frog to protect those still alive. Fine full-color photos grace every page in this excellent exposition of science at work in field and lab. An author's note is appended, as is a listing of local and global rescue efforts. Pair this gem with Pamela Turner's equally fascinating The Frog Scientist (Houghton, 2009) detailing an investigation into the effects of agricultural chemicals on frog populations, and for a nifty look at froggy facts, try Mark Moffett's colorful Face to Face with Frogs (National Geographic, 2008).&12; Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY
School Library Journal Starred Review
Gr 5&11;7&12; This eye-catching, well-written book provides a window into the efforts of a coalition of scientists, wildlife groups, and zoos to decode the mysterious die-off of the Panamanian golden frog, which began in the mid 1990s. Markle follows the work of biologist Karen Lips as she studied and investigated the deaths of so many of these creatures. Further, it records the work of Project Golden Frog to protect those still alive. Fine full-color photos grace every page in this excellent exposition of science at work in field and lab. An author's note is appended, as is a listing of local and global rescue efforts. Pair this gem with Pamela Turner's equally fascinating The Frog Scientist (Houghton, 2009) detailing an investigation into the effects of agricultural chemicals on frog populations, and for a nifty look at froggy facts, try Mark Moffett's colorful Face to Face with Frogs (National Geographic, 2008).&12; Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY
Starred Review ALA Booklist
*Starred Review* In 1996, biologist Karen Lips revisited a high mountain forest in Panama, where she had studied Panamanian golden frogs four years earlier. On this trip, though, she found only dead frogs. After a pathologist discovered unusual sacs under their skin, a newspaper article about Lips' research led to communication with other scientists worldwide and the discovery that a fungus was killing off the frogs. Launched in 1999, Project Golden Frog collects healthy animals and keeps them in zoos and conservation centers until the fungus can be controlled and the frogs can be safely returned home. Since 2008, few golden frogs have been found in the wild. Notable for clarity, directness, and simplicity of writing and design alike, this volume, both handsome and fascinating, begins with the hunt for the frogs' killer and ends with the urgent need to create a safe environment for their return to the wild. Excellent photos, microscopic views, and maps illustrate the book. Back matter includes a glossary, recommended reading lists, and an author's note. While few readers will take up Markle's suggestion to "become the science detective who finally stops this killer," many will absorb the notion that scientific research can be intrinsically interesting and vitally important. Pair this book with Turner's The Frog Scientist (2009).
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
Starred Review ALA Booklist (Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 CDT 2011)
ALA Booklist (Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 CDT 2011)
Horn Book (Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 CDT 2012)
Kirkus Reviews
National Science Teachers Association Outstanding Science Trade
Science Books and Films
School Library Journal (Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 CDT 2011)
Wilson's Children's Catalog
Wilson's High School Catalog
Wilson's Junior High Catalog
Bibliography Index/Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Word Count: 3,871
Reading Level: 5.7
Interest Level: 4-7
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 5.7 / points: 1.0 / quiz: 145221 / grade: Middle Grades
Reading Counts!: reading level:6.3 / points:4.0 / quiz:Q54601
Lexile: 910L

Panamanian golden frogs aren't just cute, little, and yellow. They're also the national symbol of Panama. But they started to disappear about fifteen years ago. What's killing them? Could it be a change in their habitat? What about pollution? Might it be a result of climate change? Follow a team of scientists working to save these frogs and protect frog populations worldwide in this real-life science mystery.


*Prices subject to change without notice and listed in US dollars.
Perma-Bound bindings are unconditionally guaranteed.
Paperbacks are not guaranteed.
Please Note: All Digital Material Sales Final.