Black Like Me
Black Like Me

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Annotation: Presents the author's experiences after dying his skin and moving to the American South to experience what it was like being Black.
Catalog Number: #32101
Binding Type: Perma-Bound Edition
Common Core/STEAM: Common Core Common Core
Receive a FREE Teacher's Guide for this title with a purchase of 20 or more copies of this book. You do not need to add a copy of the Teacher's Guide to your list, it will be automatically included with your order after the minimum number of copies is ordered.
Copyright Date: 1960
Edition Date: 1996
Pages: 192 p.
Availability: Available
ISBN: Publisher: 0-451-23421-9 Perma-Bound: 0-8479-0961-1
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-0-451-23421-6 Perma-Bound: 978-0-8479-0961-2
Dewey: 921
LCCN: 76047690
Dimensions: 18 cm.
Language: English
Reviewing Agencies:
New York Times Book Review
Wilson's High School Catalog
Word Count: 61,956
Reading Level: 7.0
Interest Level: 9+
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 7.0 / points: 11.0 / quiz: 730 / grade: Upper Grades
Reading Counts!: reading level:9.0 / points:14.0
Lexile: 990L

THE HISTORY-MAKING CLASSIC ABOUT CROSSING THE COLOR LINE IN AMERICA'S SEGREGATED SOUTH

“One of the deepest, most penetrating documents yet set down on the racial question.”—Atlanta Journal & Constitution

 
In the Deep South of the 1950’s, a color line was etched in blood across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. Journalist John Howard Griffin decided to cross that line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a Southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man.
 
What happened to John Howard Griffin—from the outside and within himself—as he made his way through the segregated Deep South is recorded in this searing work of nonfiction. His audacious, still chillingly relevant eyewitness history is a work about race and humanity every American must read.
 
With an Epilogue by the author
and an Afterword by Robert Bonazzi