I Am Odd, I Am New
I Am Odd, I Am New
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Publisher's Hardcover14.74

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Annotation: Through the eyes of 10-year-old Benjamin Giroux, being odd is different, and different is a good thing. This is what the... more
Genre: [Poetry]
Catalog Number: #311449
Format: Perma-Bound from Publisher's Hardcover
Copyright Date: 2021
Edition Date: 2021
Illustrator: Maclean, Roz,
Pages: 32
Availability: Available
New Title: Yes
ISBN: Publisher: 0-7643-6241-0 Perma-Bound: 0-8000-1184-8
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-0-7643-6241-5 Perma-Bound: 978-0-8000-1184-0
Dewey: 811
LCCN: 2020952566
Dimensions: 27 cm
Language: English
Reviews:
Kirkus Reviews
An elementary-age kid tries to find a place in a world that makes him feel devastatingly different.Who belongs where? Who can belong? The narrator compares himself to those around him and feels isolated. Should he even try to fit in? He hears “noises in the air.” No one else seems to—why him? If he shrinks and hides away, will people stop laughing? Why can’t he be like the kids he sees walking past the window? Did he come from outer space? Buffeted by this feeling of oddness, he seems to find no answers until he realizes that he isn’t the only one—everyone is “odd and new,” and that is not such a bad thing. Written when the autistic author was 10, Giroux’s poetic exploration of being/feeling different from the perspective of living on the spectrum brings to light that being neurodivergent is not the same as being broken or “less.” Being different is not an insurmountable obstacle to experiencing life but rather a gift to experience more. In metaphorical scenes that vary from spread to spread as they interpret the lines, MacLean’s soft-hued illustrations show the narrator, depicted as a bespectacled White kid, as apart yet a part of the world around him. The predominance of blues and purples emphasizes the sense of separateness. The foreword by the National Autism Association states: “No one has ever made a difference in the world by being the same.” (This book was reviewed digitally.)Giroux expresses core truths through his insightful and heartfelt poem. (Picture book. 5-10)
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
An elementary-age kid tries to find a place in a world that makes him feel devastatingly different.Who belongs where? Who can belong? The narrator compares himself to those around him and feels isolated. Should he even try to fit in? He hears “noises in the air.” No one else seems to—why him? If he shrinks and hides away, will people stop laughing? Why can’t he be like the kids he sees walking past the window? Did he come from outer space? Buffeted by this feeling of oddness, he seems to find no answers until he realizes that he isn’t the only one—everyone is “odd and new,” and that is not such a bad thing. Written when the autistic author was 10, Giroux’s poetic exploration of being/feeling different from the perspective of living on the spectrum brings to light that being neurodivergent is not the same as being broken or “less.” Being different is not an insurmountable obstacle to experiencing life but rather a gift to experience more. In metaphorical scenes that vary from spread to spread as they interpret the lines, MacLean’s soft-hued illustrations show the narrator, depicted as a bespectacled White kid, as apart yet a part of the world around him. The predominance of blues and purples emphasizes the sense of separateness. The foreword by the National Autism Association states: “No one has ever made a difference in the world by being the same.” (This book was reviewed digitally.)Giroux expresses core truths through his insightful and heartfelt poem. (Picture book. 5-10)
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Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
Reading Level: 2.0
Interest Level: P-2

Through the eyes of 10-year-old Benjamin Giroux, being odd is different, and different is a good thing. This is what the then fifth-grader hoped to convey in his poem, beginning every few sentences with I am," about what it is like to live with autism. Inspired by a school assignment, Benjamin's raw and emotional words poured out onto the page, but when he feared they were not any good, his parents shared the poem with friends and family. Little did they know that it would go viral and end up inspiring thousands of strangers who identified with him to share their support. Now for the first time, Benjamin's iconic poem I Am Odd, I Am New, comes to life in this lovingly illustrated picture book with a foreword written by the National Autism Association. So whether you know the poem, or it is new to you, discover how Benjamin's honesty will reassure children of all ages that it's okay to be different.


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