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Annotation: Although Tommy fails to get the part of Peter Rabbit in the kindergarten play, he still finds a way to be the center of attention on stage.
Catalog Number: #282131
Format: Perma-Bound Edition
All Formats: Search
Common Core/STEAM: Common Core Common Core
Copyright Date: 2005
Edition Date: 2007
Pages: 32
Availability: Available
ISBN: Publisher: 0-14-240899-9 Perma-Bound: 0-605-37721-9
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-0-14-240899-5 Perma-Bound: 978-0-605-37721-9
Dewey: E
LCCN: 2004009261
Dimensions: 26 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
Tommy hopes for the lead role in his kindergarten class production of Peter Rabbit, but his teacher assigns him to play Mopsy, who has no lines. Tommy makes the most of what he has, though, reacting (actually, overreacting) to every move by Peter Rabbit and stealing the show. The audience cheers him, but Tommy's mother sets him straight, and he later apologizes to his classmate and his teacher. Children will empathize with Tommy all the way, from ambition to temptation to reconciliation. The gently delivered lesson at the end does not dampen the fun of watching this aspiring thespian get carried away when he hears the audience respond to his onstage antics. The classroom milieu will look familiar to children despite the differences in dress that indicate an earlier era. With its warm palette, rounded shapes, and clarity of expression, dePaola's signature style makes Tommy's world an inviting place to visit.
Horn Book
Retelling an anecdote previously published in his chapter book Here We All Are, the popular illustrator recalls playing Mopsy and stealing scenes in a kindergarten production of Peter Rabbit. While Here We All Are makes the incident one among many, the picture book format puts it on center stage, with an effective blend of full-page and paneled pictures conveying the drama with theatrical flair.
Kirkus Reviews
DePaola recounts another anecdote from his childhood in this school story that explores the concept of "stealing the show." The main character, Tommy, is very interested in dancing and acting, and he hopes to be cast as Peter Rabbit in the class play. When he's cast instead in a minor role as Mopsy the rabbit sibling, he upstages everyone during the performance, earning lots of laughs and applause, but displeasing his mom and teacher. Tommy has to apologize to his teacher and to the boy who played Peter Rabbit, but he can't forget the laughter and applause and can't wait for his next performance opportunity. Teachers putting on classroom plays of their own will find this story useful, both for its thoughtful exploration of appropriate behavior on stage and for a general introduction to the theatrical experience. As in DePaola's other stories that incorporate his childhood memories, this classroom is a peek back into an earlier time, with boys in knickers and girls in dresses and hair bows, but the emotions of a budding thespian remain the same. (Picture book. 5-8)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Tommy knows that he will be the perfect Peter in his kindergarten class's production of Peter Rabbit. After all, he knows how to tap dance, and everyone was impressed with his performance in the Thanksgiving play. However, Miss Bird casts him as Mopsy. Determined to be the best Mopsy he can be, he decides to take his tap teacher's suggestion and react to the other performers on stage. Ultimately, Tommy steals the show, and the boy who plays Peter loses his chance to be the star. After a bit of gentle urging from his mother, Tommy does the right thing and apologizes, but still can't wait to get onstage once again. Filled with warm colors and gentle humor, dePaola's illustrations are as impressive as always. The characters' emotions are clearly conveyed through the arch of an eyebrow or the angle of a line-drawn mouth. Through both words and pictures, the artist sets the stage for a fun story that kids will love, and a good lesson about sharing the limelight.-Kelley Rae Unger, Peabody Institute, MA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Word Count: 1,002
Reading Level: 3.0
Interest Level: P-2
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 3.0 / points: 0.5 / quiz: 86217 / grade: Lower Grades
Reading Counts!: reading level:5.3 / points:6.0 / quiz:Q10830
Lexile: 810L
Guided Reading Level: J

Tommy is so excited. His first-grade class is putting on a play about Peter Rabbit, and he’s sure to get the starring role. But in his enthusiasm, Tommy talks too much in class, so his teacher decides that he should play Mopsy instead—and Mopsy doesn’t have any lines! Tommy is disappointed until he gets an idea. If he can’t be the star, he can still get the audience’s attention by reacting to everything Peter Rabbit does. But how will Tommy’s mother and teacher react to his performance?


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