Finish the Fight: The Brave and Revolutionary Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote
Finish the Fight: The Brave and Revolutionary Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote

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Annotation: This exciting collaboration with the New York Times will reveal the untold stories of the diverse heroines who fought for the 19th amendment. On the 100th anniversary of the historic win for women's rights, it's time to celebrate the names and stories of the women whose courage helped change the fabric of America.
Genre: Biographies
Catalog Number: #240798
Format: Perma-Bound Edition from Publisher's Hardcover
All Formats: Search
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
Copyright Date: 2020
Edition Date: c2020
Illustrator: Ahanonu, Monica,
Pages: 132 p.
Availability: Available
ISBN: Publisher: 0-358-40830-X Perma-Bound: 0-7804-8728-1
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-0-358-40830-7 Perma-Bound: 978-0-7804-8728-4
Dewey: 920
Dimensions: 24 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
Horn Book
Also by members of the staff of the New York Times. Illustrated by various artists. Among the social justice movements at the core of American history is women's suffrage. In this commemoration of the one-hundredth anniversary of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, the authors have brought previously unsung heroines to the forefront. Women of various races, nationalities, and sexual orientations are celebrated for their contributions to the suffrage movement, even as many fought to be recognized as U.S. citizens. Their stories are woven into the key moments of the suffrage movement, beginning with the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, held in upstate New York close to the Haudenosaunee/Iroquois community (who had long embraced women in voting and leadership positions). Care is taken to detail the work of all the women profiled, including when, exactly, they themselves secured the right to vote (for example, due to the Chinese Exclusion Act, Chinese American women were not allowed to vote until 1943). Careful to avoid a "happily ever after" message, the book reminds readers that "the battle over who is fully included in American democracy continues." Eye-catching illustrations by various artists bolster these stories of activism and perseverance, including a double-page spread presenting the timeline of women's suffrage as a board game, complete with twists and turns. The back matter comprises an authors' note; suffragist "playing cards"; a comparison chart of women in government leadership positions, from 1920 to 2020; and an (unseen) bibliography and index. There are no source notes indicated in the galley. See also How Women Won the Vote and Lifting as We Climb, reviewed on pages 111 and 115.
Kirkus Reviews
An illustrated introduction to many women of color and queer women responsible for voting rights in America.Beginning with the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, whose historic territory was the site of the Seneca Falls convention, and ending with Dakota Sioux activist Zitkála-Šá, this friendly primer highlights the lesser-known heroes whose fight for their right to vote did not end with the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Chambers and her co-authors from the New York Times strike an authoritative yet colloquial tone: “[T]here are tons of women beyond Susan [B. Anthony] and Elizabeth [Cady Stanton]’s demographic who helped make suffrage a reality for all women,” they write. Well-chosen quotes and engaging biographical information about such activists as Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Mary McLeod Bethune, Angelina Weld Grimké, Mabel Ping-hua Lee, and Jovita Idár are interspersed with trenchant observations from contemporary women working in service to their ancestors’ ideals, including Louise Herne, Charlotte Brooks, and Vilma Martínez. White and straight women are supporting characters, either as allies or barriers. Ornate, colorful page layouts also include playful doodles, at times somewhat distractingly atop historial images. Stories like that of Susette La Flesche Tibbles, who had to stand up to several white government officials before she could become the first Native woman to teach on her reservation, emphasize the theme that rights require constant advocacy. Timely, moving, and necessary. (authors’ note, minibiographies, timeline, statistics, acknowledgements, further reading, bibliography, index) (Collective biography. 8-14)
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
An illustrated introduction to many women of color and queer women responsible for voting rights in America.Beginning with the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, whose historic territory was the site of the Seneca Falls convention, and ending with Dakota Sioux activist Zitkála-Šá, this friendly primer highlights the lesser-known heroes whose fight for their right to vote did not end with the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Chambers and her co-authors from the New York Times strike an authoritative yet colloquial tone: “[T]here are tons of women beyond Susan [B. Anthony] and Elizabeth [Cady Stanton]’s demographic who helped make suffrage a reality for all women,” they write. Well-chosen quotes and engaging biographical information about such activists as Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Mary McLeod Bethune, Angelina Weld Grimké, Mabel Ping-hua Lee, and Jovita Idár are interspersed with trenchant observations from contemporary women working in service to their ancestors’ ideals, including Louise Herne, Charlotte Brooks, and Vilma Martínez. White and straight women are supporting characters, either as allies or barriers. Ornate, colorful page layouts also include playful doodles, at times somewhat distractingly atop historial images. Stories like that of Susette La Flesche Tibbles, who had to stand up to several white government officials before she could become the first Native woman to teach on her reservation, emphasize the theme that rights require constant advocacy. Timely, moving, and necessary. (authors’ note, minibiographies, timeline, statistics, acknowledgements, further reading, bibliography, index) (Collective biography. 8-14)
Starred Review ALA Booklist
*Starred Review* This informative book takes a refreshingly inclusive approach to the history of women's voting rights in the United States. In addition to recognizing the contributions of well-known figures such as Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, it widens the spotlight, profiling leaders who have represented minorities and describing the particular challenges they have faced as they worked to promote women's suffrage. Representing generations of voting-rights activists within the American Indian, Black, Chinese American, Latina, and LGBTQ+ communities, the featured leaders include Mary Church Terrell, Angelina Weld Grimké, Mary Burrill, Mabel Ping-Hua Lee, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Jovita Idár, Susette La Flesche Tibbles, and Zitkála-Šá. The text, written with clarity and verve, also acknowledges racist attitudes within the mainstream women's suffrage organizations of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, while showing how the voting-rights movement was intertwined with other important causes, such as abolition, temperance, and the struggle of Native Americans to protect their lands and traditions. The book has a fresh, inviting look. Illustrations include vibrant, distinctive, full-page digital portraits as well as period photos and documents brightened with colorful elements. An appended section features 46 "Brave and Revolutionary Women You Should Know" and displays their images on "trading cards" along with fast facts. A valuable resource for library collections.Women in Focus: The 19th in 2020
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
Starred Review ALA Booklist (6/1/20)
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
Horn Book
Bibliography Index/Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 127-129) and index.
Word Count: 20,198
Reading Level: 8.1
Interest Level: 4-7
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 8.1 / points: 4.0 / quiz: 510139 / grade: Middle Grades

CHAPTER 1

The Haudenosaunee Model

On July 14, 1848, an advertisement appeared in a newspaper in Seneca Falls in upstate New York, announcing "a Convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman." A few days later, on July 19, some three hundred women and men gathered in a local church for what is often said to be the first meeting dedicated specifically to women's rights. There, after two days of impassioned conversation, one hundred people signed a document modeled on the Declaration of Independence--but adding two words to its most famous passage: "All men and women are created equal."
      The document was known as the Declaration of Sentiments. It had been hashed out on a parlor table by a small group of women, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott. Elizabeth was a well-to-do woman who was chafing under traditional ideas about marriage and motherhood. Lucretia was a Quaker, a member of a religious group that already had strong ideas about equality between men and women. Like many of the early suffragists, these two women were ardent abolitionists--a term for people, both black and white, who were fighting to put an end to slavery.
      The fight against slavery spurred some white women to think about their own situations. Although marriage was hardly slavery, women in 1848, no matter their race, had highly unequal rights compared with men. In some states, married women were required to surrender all their property to their husbands. In a divorce, women often had no right to custody of their children. And in many places it was not illegal for their husbands to beat them.
      Even in the abolitionist movement, men and women weren't equal. At meetings, women often weren't allowed to speak. At one antislavery meeting in London in 1840, the women were forced to sit silently behind a curtain, which left many of them, including Elizabeth and Lucretia, fuming.
      The Declaration of Sentiments, mostly written by Elizabeth, demanded total equality for women in economics, family life, and religion. It also included a demand that women have an equal right to vote--a demand so radical that Lucretia opposed including it in the document at all, warning that it would make the Seneca Falls Convention look "ridiculous."
      And many newspapers that wrote about the convention did make fun of it. One called it "the most shocking and unnatural event ever recorded in the history of womanity." The African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass--who attended the meeting and supported women's right to vote--observed that a meeting dedicated to the rights of animals would have been greeted with more respect. That's how radical the notion of women's suffrage was at the time.
      But the idea of women's equality, and women voting, wasn't outrageous to everyone in 1848. In fact, some women in America already had a say in choosing their leaders--and they were living right in the convention's backyard.

The town of Seneca Falls was located in the historic territory of the Haudenosaunee, a confederacy of six Native American nations (including the Seneca Nation, which gave the town its name) stretching across what became New York State. And long before the arrival of Europeans, the Haudenosaunee, also known as the Iroquois, practiced a form of representative democracy that gave significant power to women.
      Haudenosaunee society was matrilineal, meaning that the clan you belonged to depended on your mother's ancestors, not your father's. Women made decisions about the land and farmed it, too. They owned the fruits of their own labor, and they kept their own property after marriage--a right that American women had only begun to fight for. Haudenosaunee women held veto power over decisions about war and peace. The clan mothers were the ones who nominated each clan's chief, known as the Hoyaneh. And they had the power to remove him, too.
      There were no Haudenosaunee among the three hundred or so women and men at the Seneca Falls meeting. The Haudenosaunee were citizens of their own nation, not of the United States. They lived in their own settlements and mostly spoke their own language. But some of the women and men who gathered in Seneca Falls might have known about Haudenosaunee customs--and the power of their women--from encounters in town or from newspapers, which regularly wrote about Haudenosaunee ceremonies and other events. And at least one person at the convention had even witnessed a political debate among Haudenosaunee women and men.
      In June 1848, a month before the convention, Lucretia Mott was part of a group of Quakers who spent a few weeks among the Haudenosaunee of the Seneca Nation in Cattaraugus, about one hundred miles southwest of Seneca Falls. The Quakers had been involved with helping the Haudenosaunee negotiate their relationship with the US government, which had forced them from much of their land. When Lucretia visited, the Haudenosaunee were debating whether to make changes in their political system. In a letter published in a local newspaper, she wrote about observing a traditional ceremonial dance and watching as both men and women spoke during debates.
      Later, as the suffrage movement grew, Native American women became powerful inspirations to some suffragists, who saw them as visionary examples of a more equal world. Among them was Matilda Joslyn Gage, who joined the women's rights movement a few years after Seneca Falls. In 1875, when she was president of the National Woman Suffrage Association, Matilda wrote a series of newspaper articles discussing the Haudenosaunee people, praising the "nearly equal" division of power between men and women in politics as well as women's "superiority in power" in the family. Matilda became so involved with the Haudenosaunee people that she received an honorary adoption into the Wolf Clan in 1893--the same year she was denied the right to vote in a school commissioner election in New York State.
      To some suffragists, Native women were powerful symbols of "the matriarchate," a kind of rule by women that they believed existed across much of the world in ancient times, before men took over. But the suffragists could express this belief in condescending ways. Even as they praised Native culture, they sometimes talked about Native people as "noble savages" who were disappearing, rather than as communities that were very much present and carrying their traditions forward.
      The Haudenosaunee women had their own battles. They were fighting to protect their people's independence and way of life, which wasn't about women ruling men, but about sharing responsibilities. During the nineteenth century the Haudenosaunee, like other Native people, were under intense pressure to adopt the Christian belief system and assimilate into white American culture. In 1848, the same year as the Seneca Falls Convention, the Seneca Nation, under pressure from the United States to implement a "civilized" form of government, adopted a written constitution. The document dissolved their traditional political system and the power it granted to clan mothers. Control of land remained with the women, but voting rights were limited to men, as they were under the US Constitution. (In fact, the Seneca Nation constitution wouldn't be changed to allow women to vote in tribal elections until 1964.)
      Some Haudenosaunee women--such as Caroline Parker Mountpleasant, also known as Ga-hah-no--learned to navigate between two worlds. Born around 1824, the daughter of a chief and a clan mother of the Seneca Wolf Clan on the Tonawanda Reservation, Caroline was educated at a missionary school and forced to do her lessons in English. She later became well known for her traditional beadwork. In 1878, she was publicly named Jigonsaseh, or "Peace Queen," a traditional title held by some of her female ancestors. Upon her death, in 1892, The New York Times noted how Caroline had served as a kind of cultural ambassador, welcoming prominent visitors from around the world into her home.
      Today, Haudenosaunee women continue to exercise their traditional decision-making power. Louise Herne is a clan mother for the Bear Clan of the Mohawk Nation. Working alongside other women, she plans ceremonies and oversees decision-making for the clan. She also nominated the current chief after consulting with the rest of the clan. "A man cannot become a leader until a woman backs him up," she said in an interview for this book. "It has to come through the voice of a woman."
      To Louise, the connection between her ancestors and the suffragists is an important piece of "hidden history" that more people should know about. In 2020, she said, "We're celebrating one hundred years of the Nineteenth Amendment. But Haudenosaunee women have had political voice for a thousand."



Excerpted from Finish the Fight!: The Brave and Revolutionary Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote by Veronica Chambers, Jessica Bennett
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

A New York Times bestseller! Who was at the forefront of women's right to vote? We know a few famous names, like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, but what about so many others from diverse backgrounds--black, Asian, Latinx, Native American, and more--who helped lead the fight for suffrage? On the hundredth anniversary of the historic win for women's rights, it's time to celebrate the names and stories of the women whose stories have yet to be told. Gorgeous portraits accompany biographies of such fierce but forgotten women as Yankton Dakota Sioux writer and advocate Zitkála-Sá, Mary Eliza Church Terrell, who cofounded the National Association of Colored Women (NACW), and Mabel Ping-Hua Lee, who, at just sixteen years old, helped lead the biggest parade in history to promote the cause of suffrage. FINISH THE FIGHT will fit alongside important collections that tell the full story of America's fiercest women. Perfect for fans of GOOD NIGHT STORIES FOR REBEL GIRLS and BAD GIRLS THROUGHOUT HISTORY.


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