You Matter
You Matter

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Annotation: They All Saw a Cat meets The Important Book in this sensitive and impactful picture book about seeing the world from dif... more
Catalog Number: #219717
Format: Perma-Bound Edition from Publisher's Hardcover
All Formats: Search
Special Formats: Hot Title Hot Title
Copyright Date: 2020
Edition Date: 2020
Pages: 40
Availability: Available
New Title: Yes
ISBN: Publisher: 1-534-42169-6 Perma-Bound: 0-7804-8417-7
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-1-534-42169-1 Perma-Bound: 978-0-7804-8417-7
Dewey: E
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
Using simple, lyrical text and expansive, colorful illustrations, Robinson assures readers that, no matter what difficulties they may encounter or how a person might feel, everyone matters: "The small stuff too small to see. / Those who swim with the tide / and those who don't. / The first to go and the last. / You matter." He points out that pests and those they annoy, those who fall and need to start over, and young and old alike are all important. Robinson's stylized acrylic-and-collage artwork lightens up the text with hopeful and sometimes humorous touches. The pest, for example, is a mosquito who bites a Tyrannosaurus rex on the tail, too far away for the behemoth to scratch with its tiny arms. This same dinosaur falls after Earth is struck by a meteor, and later a gassy planet (presumably Earth, post-extinction) renews itself. Throughout, Robinson depicts characters who are diverse in terms of ethnicities and abilities. Nonjudgmental and reassuring, this is a great choice for anyone experiencing a bad day.
Kirkus Reviews
Employing a cast of diverse children reminiscent of that depicted in Another (2019), Robinson shows that every living entity has value.After opening endpapers that depict an aerial view of a busy playground, the perspective shifts to a black child, ponytails tied with beaded elastics, peering into a microscope. So begins an exercise in perspective. From those bits of green life under the lens readers move to “Those who swim with the tide / and those who don’t.” They observe a “pest”—a mosquito biting a dinosaur, a “really gassy” planet, and a dog whose walker—a child in a pink hijab—has lost hold of the leash. Periodically, the examples are validated with the titular refrain. Textured paint strokes and collage elements contrast with uncluttered backgrounds that move from white to black to white. The black pages in the middle portion foreground scenes in space, including a black astronaut viewing Earth; the astronaut is holding an image of another black youngster who appears on the next spread flying a toy rocket and looking lonely. There are many such visual connections, creating emotional interest and invitations for conversation. The story’s conclusion spins full circle, repeating opening sentences with new scenarios. From the microscopic to the cosmic, word and image illuminate the message without a whiff of didacticism.Whimsy, intelligence, and a subtle narrative thread make this rise to the top of a growing list of self-love titles. (Picture book. 4-7)
Publishers Weekly
Simple and heartfelt, the refrain of Caldecott Honoree Robinson-s poem speaks directly to readers: -You matter.- In a neat rhetorical twist, the line also refers to the Earth itself, whose evolutionary
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1 Robinson follows up his acclaimed debut Another with more of his spirited illustrations and spare, reaffirming prose. From "the small stuff too small to see," viewed by a young girl peering through a microscope, Robinson depicts the perspectives of many creatures and people. Robinson's cut paper illustrations depict a timeline of existence through prehistoric times, through space, and finally in a contemporary, urban setting. Each spread contains small details that link one scene to the next, emphasizing his message of connectivity. Robinson captures sentiments many young readers are familiar with ("when everyone thinks you're a pest," "the first to go and the last") and repeats the titular phrase throughout the book as an uplifting mantra. Robinson conveys complex themes, hinting at the universality of emotions, while validating the individual emotional journey of young readers. The choice of characters and settings work seamlessly to convey the passage of time and the endurance of his message of resilience and the significance of how we all relate and contribute to the world around us. VERDICT An earnest message and charming illustrations grow more poignant under closer reading. Highly recommended.Jessica Agudelo, New York Public Library
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
Employing a cast of diverse children reminiscent of that depicted in Another (2019), Robinson shows that every living entity has value.After opening endpapers that depict an aerial view of a busy playground, the perspective shifts to a black child, ponytails tied with beaded elastics, peering into a microscope. So begins an exercise in perspective. From those bits of green life under the lens readers move to “Those who swim with the tide / and those who don’t.” They observe a “pest”—a mosquito biting a dinosaur, a “really gassy” planet, and a dog whose walker—a child in a pink hijab—has lost hold of the leash. Periodically, the examples are validated with the titular refrain. Textured paint strokes and collage elements contrast with uncluttered backgrounds that move from white to black to white. The black pages in the middle portion foreground scenes in space, including a black astronaut viewing Earth; the astronaut is holding an image of another black youngster who appears on the next spread flying a toy rocket and looking lonely. There are many such visual connections, creating emotional interest and invitations for conversation. The story’s conclusion spins full circle, repeating opening sentences with new scenarios. From the microscopic to the cosmic, word and image illuminate the message without a whiff of didacticism.Whimsy, intelligence, and a subtle narrative thread make this rise to the top of a growing list of self-love titles. (Picture book. 4-7)
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
ALA Booklist (4/1/20)
Horn Book (4/1/20)
Kirkus Reviews (4/1/20)
Publishers Weekly (4/1/20)
School Library Journal (4/1/20)
Reading Level: 2.0
Interest Level: K-3
Lexile: AD310L

They All Saw a Cat meets The Important Book in this sensitive and impactful picture book about seeing the world from different points of view by Caldecott and Coretta Scott King Honoree Christian Robinson.

In this full, bright, and beautiful picture book, many different perspectives around the world are deftly and empathetically explored—from a pair of bird-watchers to the pigeons they’re feeding. Young readers will be drawn into the luminous illustrations inviting them to engage with the world in a new way and see how everyone is connected, and that everyone matters.


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