Surviving the City
Surviving the City

List Price:

$32.57
School Discount
Price:

$22.80
Qty(25-99)
Discount Price:

$22.34
Qty(100-249)
Discount Price:

$22.12
Qty(250-499)
Discount Price:

$21.89
Qty(>500)
Discount Price:

$21.43
To purchase this item, you must first login or register for a new account.

Annotation: Miikwan (Anishinaabe) and Dez (Inninew) are best friends. Together, the teens navigate the challenges of growing up Indigenous in the city--they're so close, they even completed their Berry Fast together. When Dez's grandmother becomes too sick, Dez can't stay with her anymore. With the threat of a group home looming, Dez can't bring herself to go home and disappears. Miikwan is devastated, and the wound of her missing mother resurfaces. Will Dez's community find her before it's too late? Will Miikwan be able to cope if they don't?
Catalog Number: #209833
Format: Perma-Bound Edition
All Formats: Search
Special Formats: Graphic Novel Graphic Novel
Publisher: Orca Books
Copyright Date: 2018
Edition Date: 2018
Illustrator: Donovan, Natasha,
Pages: 54 pages
Availability: Available
New Title: Yes
ISBN: Publisher: 1-553-79756-6 Perma-Bound: 0-7804-7593-3
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-1-553-79756-2 Perma-Bound: 978-0-7804-7593-9
Dewey: Fic
Dimensions: 26 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
Kirkus Reviews
A debut YA graphic novel finds a teenager emotionally and then physically adrift as her home life worsens.Miikwan and Dez are Indigenous Canadian teens. Miikwan, who is Anishinaabe, has lost her mother. Dez, who is Inninew, lives with her grandmother (or kokum). The girls are best friends—like sisters—who completed their yearlong Berry Fast together (which teaches girls entering womanhood patience). One day, Dez learns that her diabetic kokum might need to have her foot removed. Further, Dez would have to live in a group home. In school, the girls choose to present their Berry Fast for a class Heritage Project. Before starting work on the project, they visit the city mall, where Miikwan's mom "always used to tell me to be careful." When the girls notice the predatory stares of older men, they leave and visit the Forks historical area. The last time they were there, they attended a rally for No More Stolen Sisters. A memorial sculpture dedicated to missing women reminds Miikwan of her own beautiful mother, whose spirit still guides her. Later, Dez returns home only to see through the window that a social worker speaks with her kokum. Devastated, she wanders into a park. Her cellphone dies, and she curls up on a bench as night falls. In this harrowing but hopeful tale, illustrator Donovan (The Sockeye Mother, 2017) and author Spillett spotlight the problem of "Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit People." While this is a global issue, the graphic novel focuses on the Winnipeg area and highlights for its target audience situations that may pose risk. While Miikwan travels alone on a bus or in the city, readers see both benign and ghoulish spirits present. Spillett knows when to hold dialogue back and allow Donovan's superb facial expressions to carry the moment, as when Dez spots the social worker in her home. Radiant colors and texting between characters should draw teens into the story, which simply and effectively showcases the need for community solutions to society's worst ills.This engrossing Indigenous tale remains a tribute to the missing and murdered and a clarion call to everyone else.
Publishers Weekly
In this haunting graphic novel, debut author Spillett and Donovan (The Sockeye Mother) present a story of girls growing up with the historical legacy of Canada-s treatment of indigenous people, particularly women and girls. Indigenous Canadian teens Dez (who is Inninew) and Miikwan (who is Anishinaabe) have always been closer than sisters; they tell each other everything and partner up to tell the story of their berry fast for a school heritage project. But after Dez learns that she can no longer live with her ailing grandmother, who is suffering from complications of diabetes, she spends the night in a park, fearing a possible move to a group home. Indigenous women routinely disappear in their city, and Miikwaan, whose own mother is dead, becomes frantic, fearing the worst. In scenes of a city spilling over with tension, Donovan renders ghosts of lost kindred walking the bright city streets alongside menacing, mostly male specters. Spillet-s appendix -Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit People- adds further context and suggestions for additional reading. Ages 13-up. (Mar.)
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
Kirkus Reviews
Publishers Weekly
Bibliography Index/Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 52-54).
Reading Level: 7.0
Interest Level: 7-12

Tasha Spillet's graphic-novel debut tells a story of kinship, resilience, cultural resurgence, and the anguish of a missing loved one. Miikwan and Dez are best friends. Miikwan is Anishinaabe; Dez is Inninew. Together, the teens navigate the challenges of growing up Indigenous in an urban landscape—they're so close, they even completed their Berry Fast together. However, when Dez's grandmother becomes too sick, Dez is told she can't stay with her anymore. With the threat of a group home looming, Dez can't bring herself to go home and disappears. Miikwan is devastated, and the wound of her missing mother resurfaces. Will Dez's community find her before it's too late? Will Miikwan be able to cope if they don't?

Surviving the City is one book in The Debwe Series.


*Prices subject to change without notice and listed in US dollars.
Perma-Bound bindings are unconditionally guaranteed (excludes textbook rebinding).
Paperbacks are not guaranteed.
Please Note: All Digital Material Sales Final.