The House with Chicken Legs
The House with Chicken Legs

List Price:

$19.06
School Discount
Price:

$13.34
Qty(25-99)
Discount Price:

$13.07
Qty(100-249)
Discount Price:

$12.94
Qty(250-499)
Discount Price:

$12.81
Qty(>500)
Discount Price:

$12.54
To purchase this item, you must first login or register for a new account.

Annotation: An extraordinary retelling of the Baba Yaga myth, this debut novel will wrap itself around your heart and never let go.
Catalog Number: #204982
Format: Perma-Bound Edition
All Formats: Search
Copyright Date: 2020
Edition Date: 2020
Pages: 262 pages
Availability: Available
New Title: Yes
ISBN: Publisher: 1-338-20997-3 Perma-Bound: 0-7804-7120-2
ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-1-338-20997-6 Perma-Bound: 978-0-7804-7120-7
Dewey: Fic
Dimensions: 20 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
Horn Book
Twelve-year-old Marinka chafes against her lonely destiny as she trains to be a Yaga like her grandmother, a witch who guides the dead to their afterlife among the stars. When she rebelliously pursues her desires at the expense of her responsibilities, everything spirals out of control. In this lyrical story, inspired by Russian folklore and shot through with grief, Marinka finds a way to balance her needs with those of others. Glos.
Kirkus Reviews
In this reimagining of Russian tales of Baba Yaga, Yagas act as benevolent Guardians of The Gate between the worlds of the living and the dead.Orphan Marinka descends on both sides from the first Yaga, whose house plied the Russian steppes. Her grandmother Baba, who is also a Yaga, is training her to take over this important job when the time comes. But the 12-year-old doesn't want to be a Yaga. A Yaga's life is secret and lonely; her (or his) only friends are the dead who stop in nightly for a celebration of their lives before the Yaga guides them back to the stars from whence they came. Then two life-changing events happen in succession: Marinka learns a devastating truth about her life and Baba disappears. Marinka has to find a way to get Baba back, but her plan may change everything forever. Anderson has fully and lovingly developed her Yaga mythology. Although the Yaga story originates in Eastern Europe, these Yagas travel all over the world to guide the dead. Marinka's story takes her to England's Lake District, an unidentified desert, a marketplace in North Africa, and to the Russian steppes. Yagas are kind, and their chicken-legged houses aren't merely a means to get from place to place. They are sentient creatures, expressing emotion and magically meeting their inhabitants' needs. Some diversity is implied based on location, and Marinka's Russian descent likewise implies that she is white.Heartbreaking, uplifting, and absolutely beautiful. (Fantasy. 8-13)
School Library Journal Starred Review
Gr 46 The wise witch of Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga, is the conduit for this coming-of-age adventure where both the living and the dead teach timely lessons about love and loss. Twelve-year-old narrator Marinka has reluctantly accepted her destiny: to learn the duties of a guardian (aka "yaga") who guides the dead through the Gate to a peaceful afterlife. Although she loves learning from her grandmother, Baba, and living in the strange house with chicken legs, she is tired of constantly picking up and moving, never making a friend among the living. When she stubbornly enacts her own plan for her future, Marinka is faced with choices that have permanent consequences. Anderson has written a plucky, compassionate heroiner in Marinka. She is completely relatable as she struggles with the desire for independence while knowing she has much to learn from her elders, peers, pets, and, surprisingly, her dwelling. The story brings Neil Gaiman's Coraline and the work of Tim Burton to mind: the first scene opens with Marinka building a fence of human femur bones with delicately balanced skulls atop. VERDICT A thoughtfully crafted, macabre masterpiece for middle grade readers, this debut novel also has the read-aloud appeal of a beloved folk or fairy tale. Jane Miller, Nashville Public Library
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
In this reimagining of Russian tales of Baba Yaga, Yagas act as benevolent Guardians of The Gate between the worlds of the living and the dead.Orphan Marinka descends on both sides from the first Yaga, whose house plied the Russian steppes. Her grandmother Baba, who is also a Yaga, is training her to take over this important job when the time comes. But the 12-year-old doesn't want to be a Yaga. A Yaga's life is secret and lonely; her (or his) only friends are the dead who stop in nightly for a celebration of their lives before the Yaga guides them back to the stars from whence they came. Then two life-changing events happen in succession: Marinka learns a devastating truth about her life and Baba disappears. Marinka has to find a way to get Baba back, but her plan may change everything forever. Anderson has fully and lovingly developed her Yaga mythology. Although the Yaga story originates in Eastern Europe, these Yagas travel all over the world to guide the dead. Marinka's story takes her to England's Lake District, an unidentified desert, a marketplace in North Africa, and to the Russian steppes. Yagas are kind, and their chicken-legged houses aren't merely a means to get from place to place. They are sentient creatures, expressing emotion and magically meeting their inhabitants' needs. Some diversity is implied based on location, and Marinka's Russian descent likewise implies that she is white.Heartbreaking, uplifting, and absolutely beautiful. (Fantasy. 8-13)
Reading Level: 5.0
Interest Level: 3-6
My house has chicken legs. Two or three times a year, without warning, it stands up in the middle of the night and walks away from where we've been living. It might walk a hundred miles or it might walk a thousand, but where it lands is always the same. A lonely, bleak place at the edge of civilization. The house nestles in the dark forbidden woods behind villages, rattles on the windswept icy tundra, and hides in the crumbling industrial ruins at the far edge of cities. At the moment it's perched on a rocky plateau high in some barren mountains. We've been here two weeks and I still haven't seen anyone living. Dead people, I've seen plenty of those of course. They come to visit Baba and she guides them through The Gate. But the real live living people, they all stay in the town and villages far below us. Maybe if it was summer a few of them would wander up here, to picnic and look at the view. They might smile and sell hello. Someone my age could visit, maybe a whole group of children on their holidays. They might stop near the stream and splash in the water to cool off. Perhaps they would invite me to join them.

Excerpted from The House with Chicken Legs by Sophie Anderson
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

All 12-year-old Marinka wants is a friend. A real friend. Not like her house with chicken legs. Sure, the house can play games like tag and hide-and-seek, but Marinka longs for a human companion. Someone she can talk to and share secrets with.

But that's tough when your grandmother is a Yaga, a guardian who guides the dead into the afterlife. It's even harder when you live in a house that wanders all over the world . . . carrying you with it. Even worse, Marinka is being trained to be a Yaga. That means no school, no parties--and no playmates that stick around for more than a day.

So when Marinka stumbles across the chance to make a real friend, she breaks all the rules . . . with devastating consequences. Her beloved grandmother mysteriously disappears, and it's up to Marinka to find her--even if it means making a dangerous journey to the afterlife.


*Prices subject to change without notice and listed in US dollars.
Perma-Bound bindings are unconditionally guaranteed (excludes textbook rebinding).
Paperbacks are not guaranteed.
Please Note: All Digital Material Sales Final.