Last of the Name
Last of the Name
$13.49
To purchase this item, you must first login or register for a new account.

Annotation: In 1863, twelve-year-old Danny and his older sister, Kathleen, arrive in New York City to start a new life, but they soon find themselves navigating through the same prejudices and struggles they experienced in Ireland.
Catalog Number: #176377
Format: Library Binding
No other formats available
Publisher: Carolrhoda Books
Copyright Date: 2019
Edition Date: 2019
Pages: 335 pages
Availability: Available
ISBN: 1-541-54159-6
ISBN 13: 978-1-541-54159-7
Dewey: Fic
LCCN: 2018015861
Dimensions: 20 cm.
Language: English
Reviews:
ALA Booklist
It's 1863 when 12-year-old Danny and his 16-year-old sister, Kathleen, arrive in New York City penniless. The only job Kathleen can find is in domestic servitude, but there's a catch: there's no spot for a boy, so they dress up Danny as Kathleen's sister. Danny struggles with all of it, especially once his eyes are opened to the many hardships of being female in the mid-nineteenth century. In one of the few moments out on the streets as himself, he's noticed for his dancing and his pure, golden voice. Could it be their ticket out of this hardscrabble existence? Textured and well-researched, Parry's latest historical novel brings to life New York City during the peak of the Civil War, particularly the tensions between the Irish immigrants and freedmen, as well as the looming draft riots. For Danny and Kathleen, there are no easy choices, but for every prejudiced, small-minded person they encounter, there seems to be another willing to sacrifice something of themselves for others. Nuanced and resonant for today's readers.
Horn Book
Destitute, orphaned Danny and Kathleen O'Carolan emigrate from Ireland to New York City during the Civil War. To stay together, older sibling Kathleen forces twelve-year-old Danny to pose as a girl so he can avoid being conscripted into the army and the two can get jobs as housemaids. A strong sense of time and place carries this novel through to its optimistic denouement.
Kirkus Reviews
Twelve-year-old Danny O'Carolan and his older sister, Kathleen, escape hunger and oppression in Ireland for the promise of a new life in America.With the threat of starvation, disease, violence, and racism on every corner, life in 1863 New York City is scarcely better for two orphans trying to find their way in the world. Danny is tempted to join the Union Army, but Kathleen insists they stay together. Unfortunately, the only work available is that of a lady's maid and a laundress. Danny gamely dons a dress in hopes of passing as a girl, but he lives for the mornings when he can escape into the city and be himself. There, he earns pennies for his dancing and singing and attracts the attention of a man who owns a theater. But he also learns that the Irish are hated not just for their faith, but because they are competing for low-wage jobs with the native-born population, including African-Americans, setting the stage for the unrest that caused the New York City draft riots. Familiar historical events are given new life through Danny's wide-eyed optimism and Kathleen's determination. And while the principals are Irish, their neighborhood boasts as diverse a population as modern Manhattan. An author's note further explains the explosive events of 1863 as the population of New York City swelled with a wave of immigrants.An exuberant dash through a pivotal year in American history. (Historical fiction. 10-14)
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
Twelve-year-old Danny O'Carolan and his older sister, Kathleen, escape hunger and oppression in Ireland for the promise of a new life in America.With the threat of starvation, disease, violence, and racism on every corner, life in 1863 New York City is scarcely better for two orphans trying to find their way in the world. Danny is tempted to join the Union Army, but Kathleen insists they stay together. Unfortunately, the only work available is that of a lady's maid and a laundress. Danny gamely dons a dress in hopes of passing as a girl, but he lives for the mornings when he can escape into the city and be himself. There, he earns pennies for his dancing and singing and attracts the attention of a man who owns a theater. But he also learns that the Irish are hated not just for their faith, but because they are competing for low-wage jobs with the native-born population, including African-Americans, setting the stage for the unrest that caused the New York City draft riots. Familiar historical events are given new life through Danny's wide-eyed optimism and Kathleen's determination. And while the principals are Irish, their neighborhood boasts as diverse a population as modern Manhattan. An author's note further explains the explosive events of 1863 as the population of New York City swelled with a wave of immigrants.An exuberant dash through a pivotal year in American history. (Historical fiction. 10-14)
Reviewing Agencies: - Find Other Reviewed Titles
Starred Review for Kirkus Reviews
ALA Booklist (3/1/19)
Horn Book (8/1/19)
School Library Journal
Word Count: 63,936
Reading Level: 4.8
Interest Level: 5-9
Accelerated Reader: reading level: 4.8 / points: 9.0 / quiz: 501102 / grade: Middle Grades
Reading Counts!: reading level:4.4 / points:16.0 / quiz:Q76948
Lexile: 720L
Guided Reading Level: P

Twelve-year-old Danny O'Carolan and his sister, Kathleen, arrive in New York City in 1863. Kathleen refuses to be parted from her only remaining relative, so she finds a job in domestic service for herself and her younger... sister . Danny reluctantly pretends to be a girl to avoid being sent to the children's workhouse or recruited as a drummer boy for the Union army. When he occasionally sneaks off to spend a few hours as a boy and share his rich talent for Irish dancing, he discovers the vast variety of New York's neighborhoods. But the Civil War draft is stoking tensions between the Irish and free black populations. With dangers escalating, how can Danny find a safe place to call home? -- "Other Print"


*Prices subject to change without notice and listed in US dollars.
Perma-Bound bindings are unconditionally guaranteed (excludes textbook rebinding).
Paperbacks are not guaranteed.
Please Note: All Digital Material Sales Final.